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Can State documents like the Wisconsin Department of Health Services documents be prepared by anyone?

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I don't wish to sound bitter, but this is the conclusion I have come to about almost all formal contracts, documentation and the like. One, you do need a lawyer. Two, you yourself need to pay close attention to what the lawyer advises, think it through, and be certain in your own mind that the advice has taken into account the details of your own situation.

Life is a minefield of unanticipated complications and unintended consequences; and even good, well-intentioned lawyers can inadvertently make boo-boos that stop a long, long way short of negligence while having enormous impact on how things turn out.

So while you need their legal expertise - because how do you know what it is that you don't know? - the responsibility and the consequences in real life land on you, the client. Work with your lawyer, but do not expect her/him to read your mind or know the future.

In this particular instance, where we're talking about DPOA, the client will of course be not you but your parent; presumably an elderly parent. This makes it all the more important that he or she receives clear explanations of what is going on and what powers he or she is bestowing on the person or people being appointed, so choose the lawyer with care. It constantly amazes me that people breeze into the realm of POA like it was nothing. When you give power of attorney to someone you are potentially placing the remainder of your life in that person's hands, for Heaven's sake! - it IS a big deal. Treat this process with the respect it is due.
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In fl u just need it notatorized
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Very good advice to "go prepared" as IsntEasy stated.
In addition to having as much info /details at the ready before your visit, also make sure you understand the lawyer's billing practices. Are you billed hourly or a flat fee, if flat fee to prepare DPOA, what is their charge 2 yrs later if a name needs changing? Are you establishing a continuing relationship whereby you or other family can call them a coupke years later, and if so, who will be paying the bill for each and every phone call? Last point is a big bone of contention in our family (lawyer bills parents & expects paid for phone calls not authorized by parents!). Be very clear beforehand who is allowed to be racking up a bill with the lawyer. Some lawyers just love family dissension, they can let it simmer & boil over and make lots of money fielding all thoee burning questions. Make sure you have any lawyer on a leash otherwise you could end up with unexpected bills like my folks did.
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I did a DPOA on Legal Zoom dot com. It was free. I did it in preparation for visiting an elder law attorney. I wanted to get the most out of my time with her, so I didn't want to waste any of it with stuff I could just as easily accomplish myself. Legal Zoom takes you through the whole document and clearly explains the ramifications of each choice you make.
So, I'd say don't pay a lawyer for a simple DPOA, but DO invest in an hour with a specialized lawyer. Go prepared. Don't pay for the time it will take the lawyer to sort out why you're there. Bring with you as many documents, facts, and figures as you can gather and organize.
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You are asking two questions I believe. The first, yes, a person does not need an attorney to make a medical power of attorney. In AZ, we actually have a website where one can print off documents to make them your own. Just have them notarized when signing. UPS actually will notarize these without having to establish competency. Banks will not when an issue of competency is involved.
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No, you do need a Lawyer to prepare a DPOA. However, filling out a form is not the reason to consult with a lawyer concerning not only the DPOA but also the other planning documents necessary to appoint a trusted individual to carry out your financial and health care directives. There are additional provisions that should be considered, and issues most have not considered. When you need a great estate or disability plan, it is to late. The issue with DPOA is that most financial institutions like banks and credit unions will not accept a DPOA for someone other than yourself to transact financial transactions, such as sign checks or make a withdrawal. You are not paying a lawyer to fill out a form, but rather to take advantage of their years of experience. Just make sure the lawyer you choose has experience in dealing with both disability and estate planning.
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The exact words are important. Making a misteak in wording can bite you, We got a packaged service from out elder affairs attorney which included a large number of estate documents and plans for care. You may find yourself dealing with interstate tasks.
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You don't need a lawyer, but if you don't know probate laws in your state, you may want a good one.
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In our state MN they have the DPOA and Health Care Directive documents right there on the State of MN Secretary of State website, along with some very helpful information on why & how to fill them out (who to name as your representative).
The reason they put those forms on there is exactly because our state WANTS average people to be able to have the benefits of these forms, without having to pay what could be a lot of money to an attorney. Simply decide whom you want to name, print out the blank forms, fill them out, and having them Notarized and witnessed. They say right on the forms to have several original Notarized copies completed, and to keep the originals in a very safe place.
As far as any forms that your state's DHS might be wanting, I'm not sure what you are asking. Maybe you could give a little more info on that part of your question.
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