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Anyone in a similar situation? Mom given an anti-psychotic drug and blood sugar dropped and seemed to make dementia worse.

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My Mother has dementia and she is MUCH more confused when she has a UTI... Sadly she has them frequently and we have done EVERYTHING we can think of to help. We have seen a urologist and tried all the other things such as cranberry juice cotton panties etc... bless her heart the Dr ordered estrogen cream and she could not figure that out!!! She looked at me blankly and said vagina??? Dementia is tricky and can be VERY hard to deal with at times.
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Sosdil1 is ABSOLUTELY correct. My mom had hilucinations, made strange and totally false accusations which I never mentioned after she improved. (don't know if she remembered, hope not.). It was the meds in her case that caused the mental confusion. I was heartbroken until someone informed me what the cause was. Good luck with your mom!
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A large change in blood sugar level can cause extreme mental confusion in anyone. I imagine if someone already has dementia, it would be that much worse.
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the other thing to look for is a urinary tract infection. Doctors only started talking about how an older person having a UTI can increase the symptoms, OR mimic the symptoms of dementia around 2009. Apparently in older people they don't have the same symptoms that we're used to (pain in urination, frequent urination, or the feeling to urinate frequently with little actual urine). My mother was acting strange and sure enough she had an UTI -- but never did she think that's what she had because she didn't have the usual symptoms. Once the UTI was cleared up, so did her thinking. It's an easy urine test to figure out.
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The brain needs a consistent level of glucose to carry out its many functions. Blood sugar imbalance has numerous physical and mental symptoms, for people of all ages. Dementia is also called Type 3 Diabetes. Remember Ronald Reagan and his cravings for jelly beans, and his dementia? Today's chronic diseases are not simply drug deficiencies, but nutritional imbalances. Neurotransmitters, necessary for proper brain function, are made by the body provided the necessary ingredients are supplied. Drugs do not supply nutritional building blocks. They actually reduce them. Search for Drug-Induced Nutritional Deficiencies. Google nutrition and dysglycemia. Cells in the body require minerals like magnesium, chromium, vanadium, etc. to help insulin enter cells. It's much wiser to give the body the necessary nutrients and minerals vs. flooding the body with extra insulin. The body works best with the proper nutritional ingredients. DAH!
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Metabolic causes of dementia include:

Endocrine disorders, such as Addison's disease or Cushing's disease
Heavy metal exposure, such as to lead, arsenic, mercury, or manganese
Repeat episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), most often seen in people with diabetes who use insulin
Hyperparathyroidism, which is very high levels of calcium in the blood
Hypothyroidism (low levels of thyroid hormone) or thyrotoxicosis (very high levels of thyroid hormone in the body)
Liver cirrhosis
Porphyria
Nutritional disorders, such as vitamin B1 deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, pellagra, or protein-calorie malnutrition
Even when people in good health have their blood sugar drop because maybe they have skipped a meal are not only weak but do not usually have clarity of mind. I hope that this will help.
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I was noticing same with my mom, but she is on so many meds, wouldnt know which pill was the problem. I reported it to her Dr & pharmacist. Funny, just today the news on KSBW news in salinas, Ca noted that there is a correlation study on hypoglycemia and dementia, unfortunately thats all i heard.
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