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Recently my Mom's PCP I brought up again about her mumbling, voice goes barely audible or she cannot find the words and it just sounds like ahhhh...... she also makes statements that do not make since? My Mom was diagnosed at hospital back in 2002 and confirmed by Psychiatrist that she had mild to moderate dementia. But her primary care Dr. seems to not listen and acts like it doesn't exist? Has anybody else gone thru this? What do I do?

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Thank you Joannes, I do jot everything down so we can discuss with Dr. but I think I am going to check on Psychiatrist who deals in Geriatric medicine. My Mom's Dr. still has her on same meds she was taking 10 years ago and when she weighed 130 lbs now 88 lbs! I have 12+ yeas in Medical field and am appalled that I have to do all the work behind the scenes why they are getting paid to do their job. Thank you!
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Yes...I see this with my Mom's PCP, who is a female and internal medicine. But, as an RN retired, who knows how health care works, the reality is that many MDs do not have the necessary time to have much narrative or to really closely assess or discuss issues. My suggestion would be to ask the PCP for referrals to appropriate specialists...and just use the PCP for physical illnesses and the general checkups. But you have to be clear and organized in doing the asking. What I do is send a fax to the doctor a day before all visits. I ask Mom to tell me what she wants to discuss and I tell her that I am sending a list to the doctor, so she doesn't forget anything. BUT, I put all my concerns on that list too, and I tell her, in a professional way, what I want her to do. For example: this month, I want her to assess Mom for depression, lack of appetite and perhaps order something that will improve her appetite. I know that certain anti depressants improve appetite. I hope she gets the hint. She did with my Dad. Then I want her to tell Mom that it's time for another visit to the Neuro Psych office to get re evaluated for her dementia. It was to have been done in February of '14, but Mom refused to go because it's a 4 hour testing app't and she didn't like it...doesn't like to have to think and figure out 'right answers'. And I want her to suggest that Mom needs a helper coming to the house part time or perhaps think about assisted living as an option. In all this, she will be making some assessments about increasing dementia...and will have to tell me what she finds. Now I have POA, so she needs to somewhat follow my wishes, or tell my why she disagrees. But, I think you also need a neurologist involved if there is dementia, and that specialist will be much more likely to discuss life style choices with dementia getting worse, and things like whether or not someone should be driving or be home alone. A geriatric psychiatrist is a similar type doctor....and for all elderly people, I do think they would do better with a geriatric specialist as their PCP rather than an internist. My Dad went to a geriatric specialist for awhile, and I do know that he scheduled much more than 15 minutes per patient. He knew that one had to move and talk slower with the elderly pt. Same with the neurologist. Every app't is at least one half hour so there is much more time to talk and assess and listen. I hope these ideas help!
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dementia isnt as visible or self evident as say , a d*ck wart or something . nearly all old timers are deluded or demented in varying degrees . there may be medical or stressor complicators involved even if some dementia is present . my aunt at nh is getting comfortable in her surroundings now and it chearful , quickwitted , and very studious . i can see the docs reluctance to place blame on dementia . a machine or automobile nearly always has a combination of factors that are causing a problem . its never like " welp , bad intake valves " . the diagnosing is ongoing even as contributing factors are eliminated one by one . edna has a little trouble with dementia ( memory retention ) combined with agitation with her many recent moves , combined with a normal sense of fear of the unknown , loss of control of her day to day routine , etc . blurting out dementia is not going to get this patient treated for all of the little complicators .
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Yes, I have had that experience. What I did is change doctors pronto.

A doctor who ignores the biggest elephant in the room does not get my vote of confidence.
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Is mom also seeing a g eriatrich psychiatrist?
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Yes, my Mom's Doctor is a Geriatric and Internal Medicine Dr. I noticed though anytime it has to do with Dementia or a psych med (Clonazepam) she wants nothing to do with it. She tried to tell me she was probably talking in her sleep? No we were both up and having coffee when her speech left?
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Are you talking with him in front of your mom? Perhaps he doesn't want to upset her? Or perhaps he only wants to address her physical needs? I would have a private conversation with him about his discomfort. Is he a geriatric specialist? We found yhat having a geriatrician overseeing mom's care made a huge difference in our understanding of all of her conditions.
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