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even if the siblings currently have joint financial POA for their elderly parent? For example, if one sibling plans to move out of the area where their elderly parent lives, and doesn't want the responsibility of POA anymore.

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Guardianship became necessary when an idiot Social Worker said that "she can make her own decisions" for a woman who was paralyzed on the left side, could not eat, needed a hoyer lift, did not know where she was, or what planet she was on. The SW had conveniently lost the MOLST and the Court Order. Fortunately we had copies to show her.
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I agree with you GardenArtist, and I was wondering the same thing myself, as to why guardianship would be necessary. I would assume guardianship would be necessary only if there were no POA's.
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Whitney, I did see that in the post. But the sibling can simply renounce her appointment and the other joint siblings would still be able to provide care. What I was wondering was since they seem to be in agreement, why guardianship would be necessary.

Perhaps the OP will return and explain.
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In reply to GardenArtist's question, I think one of the siblings may be moving out of the area, and doesn't want any responsibility anymore.
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The judge will look favorably on this if all are in agreement and the evaluator considers the parent to be in need of guardianship. We got Guardian status at the very first hearing because we all agreed and so did Mom.
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Just wondering...if the family is in agreement on who should handle care, and if a financial POA is in place, why are you seeking guardianship? Do you need more control than exists?

You do realize that reports have to be made to the court once it's involved?
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