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When my mother did durable poa with me, she was the primary caregiver for my father so the document indicates wishes for both her and my father but she signed it, not my father who was not capable of signing off......after a recent tragic accident, she is now incapacitated. Does this poa cover both my mother and father?? or just my mother since she was the only parent who signed it?? I'm asking because my sibling is threatening to apply for guardianship of both parents and I don't think that's possible since the poa exists BUT does it apply to both parents?? Can she still obtain guardianship of either parent or both??

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The answer depends on the document which I am not privy to.
However from what you have described, if mom properly executed a POA it is valid.
If your father did not properly execute a POA, it is not valid.
There is no such thing as a "joint" POA.
Regardless of the validity of the POA, your sister can petition for guardianship at anytime.
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me and my mother signing the document/dpoa and having it notarized/signed by a notary public----that's enough to make it valid?? or does an attorney need to be involved??
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no, an attorney does not need to be involved. There are template POA forms available on the internet and other places. The problem I see with templates is they may not address everything applicable to your situation. Being POA would not preclude your sister from filing for guardianship or conservatorship. My suggestion would be to find a certified geriatric care manager that could be an impartial third party. I would think that a judge would be hesitant to award to your sister if your mother had chosen you and she was competent at the time.
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