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Well, perhaps the first thing to do is to get your paws on some good, authoritative information about the Dos and Don'ts of being somebody's POA.

Past misbehaviour - expensive misbehaviour at that - a fondness for creature comforts and exciting ideas about her son's imminent marriage... yes, I can certainly see why you would have considerable qualms about your sister's plans for your mother's spending. But before you despair, try communication first.

If your sister is in fact a reformed character with no evil designs, and she's not being intentionally dense, she should perfectly well understand that her taking over access to all of your mother's assets is not something that you or anybody else who cares about your mother is going to shrug off and accept. These are uncomfortable conversations, but if you can make it clear that you are asking reasonable questions, and that a question is not the same thing as an accusation, perhaps it will be productive.

Your alternative is to go and take your mother physically back to the attorney who handled the recent documentation, explain your concerns giving dates and known facts, and get advice on a re-think. Sorry - you said that. Good idea, I agree.

It's also not promising that your mother is scared of saying no to your sister. When you say scared, do you mean squeamish about saying no in general or actually afraid of possible consequences, and if so what consequences?
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I just started putting all the pieces together within the past month. She thinks that my mom should pay for everything, going out to eat, groceries, to get toenails and fingernails done. She doesn't pay for anything. I am trying to go about this to where my mom doesn't suffer. She also signed her trustee of all the money to grand kids and great grand kids. Her son is getting married in November and she thinks my mom should pay for flight, hotel, eating and whatever she wants. My mom is scared of saying no to her. I need to know where I find that you have to be competent and trust worthy when appointed power of attorney and trustee. Right now I am looking for more concrete evidence so I can present it to the lawyer that drew it up.
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I just started putting all the pieces together within the past month. She thinks that my mom should pay for everything, going out to eat, groceries, to get toenails and fingernails done. She doesn't pay for anything. I am trying to go about this to where my mom doesn't suffer. She also signed her trustee of all the money to grand kids and great grand kids. Her son is getting married in November and she thinks my mom should pay for flight, hotel, eating and whatever she wants. My mom is scared of saying no to her. I need to know where I find that you have to be competent and trust worthy when appointed power of attorney and trustee. Right now I am looking for more concrete evidence so I can present it to the lawyer that drew it up.
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On the contrary. Power of Attorney is a position of trust, and for your sister to spend your parents' money on anything that is not directly for their benefit or in their interest or specified by them while in their right mind is an abuse of that trust.

Have you discussed POA arrangements in general with your mother?
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No it does not give her that right. You should report these actions to the police and press charges of theft.
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Mom dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2014. My mom became his guardian. My sister move down from Florida and moved in with them for only 2 weeks and she is still there. She has since manipulated my mom into signing power of attorney and it's not a small estate either. My sister has had alcohol and drug abuse in her past to where she contracted hepatitis c. I do not trust her at all. She has set up on line banking without my mom's knowledge. Do power of attorney give her the right to spend their money on herself.
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I am thinking back to when my parents were each other's Power of Attorney. Of course when the POA's were drawn up they were much younger, and once they were in their 90's it was very difficult for either of them to act as Power of Attorney.

Example, Dad went to the ER after he fell, I wanted my Mom to come with us but she didn't want to and it was understandable being in her late 90's she was legally blind and couldn't hear very well, she felt she wouldn't be able to understand the doctors. It was then that I told Dad that he and Mom need to update their Power of Attorney.

I suggested that my parents both still represent each other and I would be second in line in case either one felt it would be better if I made the decisions. The Elder Law Attorney suggested the same thing so new POA's were drawn up and signed. This way both parents still felt they were important, and could make decisions on simple things if needed.
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From your profile, I understand that your sister became your step-father's POA and later your mother became his guardian? Your sister's POA for him is no longer valid since your mother is his guardian.

Did your mother make your sister her POA?

Is your sister someone who can be trusted with being a POA? If not, why?
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Depends on what you mean by "fit," but in the old-fashioned, legalistic sense of being an upright citizen without known character flaws (e.g. a criminal record) then yes. You will have to check what laws, regulations and processes apply in your particular state, but as a rule objections can be raised to power of attorney being held by someone who is not a "fit and proper" person.

In terms of age and infirmity, though, no. Though obviously it is only common sense to give Power of Attorney to someone who is likely to be able to exercise it for longer than you are, at least.

Would you like to explain what you're concerned about?
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