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My father (deceased 4 years) had changed the beneficiary from my mom to his adult children over 13 years ago. My brother who has been POA for my mom (she has dementia) just told me that this is why my mom was recently declared ineligible for Medicaid. She was just denied. My brother becomes very defensive if I ask any questions regarding her finances. I had my head bit off when I questioned why he gifted over $10,000 to kids and grandchildren from her a couple of years ago.
I think the IRA was changed well before the look back period and therefore wouldn't be a factor in her eligibility? Does anyone know?

You are right. Its the 10k that she was turned down. She maybe able to get Medicaid but there will be a penalty period where she would have to private pay for a month or so. Those kids and grands will have to pay the "gift" back towards Mom care. Medicaid may not give you info on Mom but you can run what you know about her finances. No, changing Dads IRAs 13 yrs ago would not effect her application now. You know what they say "though protests too much".
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Reply to JoAnn29
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I think the gifts were a problem -the POA said that an attorney advised him to start gifting her assets- what attorney would advise that
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Reply to anonymous810070
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But, do you believe the proxy? From what you wrote, he isn't that forthcoming.

Do you have a good enough relationship with the staff of the facility where she's staying that you could ask them, assuming that they assisted in the Medicaid application?

You raise a good point; your brother's got control of the fund as well as the information. Do you trust him?
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Reply to GardenArtist
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The POA said the gifts were not the reason for being denied/and said it was the IRA- even though she was not a beneficiary of the IRA it seems to be the reason -I don't know how to find out without upsetting the POA as he will think I don't believe him -
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Reply to anonymous810070
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Suzette, what was the source of the "gifts" from your mother (via the proxy brother) a few years ago? I'm wondering if that's what disqualified her, not the IRAs. If I understand correctly, she's no longer even a beneficiary of the IRAs.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Maybe? If your parents lived in a community property state, your mother may have had some rights to the IRA accounts, regardless of what the beneficiary designation stated. Since dad died four years ago, the five-year look-back period would probably be based on when he died and not when the beneficiaries were changed.
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Reply to AlfredR
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