Follow
Share

I do my job with pride and confidence care for my clients like they were family I think that makes me a nightmare of a caregiver.

Find Care & Housing
Gnash gnash...

Right. So where we are is that you have left an agency because of a difference of opinion with its owner over your duty to a client, and you want us to confirm that you are right and the owner is wrong as regards your fundamental attitudes to what the service is *for*.

The last straw was a client who needed a shower and didn't get one. But you have to realise that we don't know why the shower didn't happen. Was it because the agency was not contracted to provide personal care? Was it because the client wouldn't co-operate? Was it because you weren't scheduled to be with the client for long enough?

If you went ahead and showered this client in spite of there being no contract to do so, then oh BROTHER are you a nightmare of a caregiver! What about insurance? What if the client had fallen? What if you had been injured during this process?

If, on the other hand, you observed that this client needed support and was not getting it, there are people you can report that possible neglect to. Feel free.

But it is no *use* just bewailing the cruel commercial and regulatory realities of the care industry. Compassion and warmth are important. But they can only happen in agencies that haven't gone broke.

If you want to be your clients' advocate and push for better attitudes and set a good example, more power to you, I wish you every success. But before you fight rules, be clear about why they might be there. I hope you're now settled with a new employer and continuing to provide excellent care.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Countrymouse
Report

Why, are you considering yourself a nightmare? Do you interfere with family and their wishes? Do you mistreat those you are caring for? From your description you sound like an excellent caregiver, one that truly does care. I think the majority of us work our jobs because we enjoy them and the challenges they present.

I cared for my mom and her hubby 24/7 for four years. I can tell you that it is very difficult and requires a deep feeling of compassion and understanding. I could NEVER care for someone other than my mom and kids, heaven forbid, if my life depended on it!

Just continue to do your job to the best of your ability. Many here would enjoy having you care for their loved one.

You must always remember, what works for you with the client, will not work for everyone. Maybe it is the client that does not want a shower? Some caregivers may have a different approach to obtain cooperation. What works for you may very well not work for another.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to gladimhere
Report

If you're a professional caregiver, you need professional boundaries. That doesn't prevent you from being warm and compassionate. It does mean that if you can't tell the difference between a client and a blood relative, you are a problem.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Countrymouse
Report
caretoomuch Nov 14, 2018
I appreciate your comment, I think you took my statement out of context. I know my place as a caregiver, I am just a caregiver that see my client as human beings and not just a pay check. I left an agency because one on the owner refuse to give a client a shower.
(0)
Report
If you think you are a nightmare of a caregiver, you're probably right. Step back from the line that you've been crossing over. Stay on the professional paid caregiver side. Provide great professional care and advice, but let the family run the show.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to polarbear
Report
caretoomuch Nov 14, 2018
I do and that's seem to be the problem, I do my job too well I don't make excuses, very competent, have a high standard when it comes to my job.
(0)
Report
Hm. Some folks really do have no one and a caring person like you is a blessing, but I wouldn't want a caregiver who acts as though they know my loved one and what is best for them better than I do, no matter how loving and competent they are. Your role is to support the family as part of the team, always keeping in mind that you are not the captain, just one of the players.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to cwillie
Report
caretoomuch Nov 14, 2018
Always.
(0)
Report
There is a place for ‘caring’ and a place for ‘doing a job’. I’ve always cared about the work I’ve done, but I know that there is work where emotional involvement has to be kept under control - eg social work. I could understand a family wanting limited emotional involvement from a paid worker. It could be difficult to have someone seem to take over a responsibility that is not their own, and increase rather than decrease the complicated relationship issues that come with dependency. Is that what is troubling you?
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to MargaretMcKen
Report
caretoomuch Nov 14, 2018
Not at all my concerns are that the clients are being abandoned and neglected by caregivers that's supposed to care for them. I had to called the state on several caregiver. Am I not to care when I see this kind of behavior?
How would you like to pay someone to care for you loved ones and that person refused them a simple shower?
(0)
Report
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter