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A mail forwarding service wants a POA to say if I receive mail for another person (my mom) at my house, they require a POA that allows me to accept her mail and act on her behalf.

I assume you are using a service that gets mail and forwards as needed because you will be traveling around. Is that correct?

Check your states attorney general website and see if they have Durable POAs, if not Arizona Attorney general website has them and you can print it out and type it up to reflect your state name. Be sure to check Durable as this is the most comprehensive.

This should fulfill their requirements to protect themselves from mail fraud and the such.
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Harley88 Jan 1, 2019
Thanks for your help
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Do you have POA for your mom? It seems to me that is the document they are looking for. It might be easier to have her mail addressed to her in care of Haley88, would that satisfy them? Or to go paperless and deal with her business on line.
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Harley88 Dec 31, 2018
No I don’t have a poa for my mom, I am thinking of finding a poa form and have her sign it in front of a notary. Thanks for Ur help
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Thank you to Granniannie, Joann29, Cmagnum, & Freqflyer, for your replies. I guess I need to be more specific. I want to go away for the winter, and the mail will forwarded to me, but since I have my moms mail coming to my house, in order to forward it to my new temporary residence they are requesting the poa that allows me to accept moms mail and act on her behalf. If it was just my mail I wanted to be forwarded it wouldn’t be a problem, but since I have mail coming to my house with her name on it that is why they are requiring a poa from mom signed. So the question is what website will allow you to print out a poa for mail forwarding? Thanks for your help.
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Ask the mail service for their change of address form, or ask any post office for one.  Then your mom can fill it out.  If she has moved, there should be no issue.  If you want POA, you can get the forms on-line.  Print it, fill it out, then your mom needs to sign it in front of 2 witnesses, one being a notary public.  My name on my aunt's checks, so I could use them to pay her bills, required the bank to see the POA form.
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Is Mom competent? Can she talk to the service? POA is assigned. Usually drawn up by a lawyer with Mom signing, witnessed and notarized.

When I had Moms address changed after she passed, I did have to give the PO a copy of my short certificate. So I assume, I would have had to produce my POA if I had done it before her death.
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The post office never asked me for such a thing when I showed them my Durable POA and explained that she was in a nursing home. I also contacted those who sent her mail and asked them to send it to me.
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Harley88, I never heard of the Post Office asking for any type of Power of Attorney form.

When it was time to transfer my Dad's mail to my house [he was moving into senior care], I just went on-line to the USPS and filled out a transfer form. The transfer cost around $1, and it worked perfectly.

Then as Dad's mail was coming to my house, I would make change-of-address on-line for the financial institutions, doctor offices, and anything else of real importance. The Post Office will not forward junk mail which was a relief :)
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