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I've been prescribed medication that I have had severe reactions to twice now. I've read on the internet the interactions between medicines I am taking and think it's so unprofessional that a doctor would not know this before they risked my life prescribing this stuff.

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Funny you should say that cause that thought had crossed my mind and yes I did try Google

This is becoming a puzzle that I will keep at till I solve I suspect.
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Reply to Gershun
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That's.... weird Gershun. Does s/he show up on Google?
Did you read about the fake nurse who worked in hospitals in Quebec for 20 years before being discovered?
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I'm not sure, I'll link an article that might help

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/ask-a-health-expert/how-do-i-do-a-background-check-on-my-doctor/article576532/

Remember though, that we Canadians aren't as litigious as our American cousins, a doctor can do a lot of harm without ever getting sued.
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Gershun Jun 2, 2019
Thx Willie. I went onto a licensing board site last night and could not find this Dr's name. I typed it in several different ways too. Full name, first initial and last name, etc. and nothing came up.
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If possible, have your doctor [preferably a new doctor] do to a DNA test for medicines. This test will show via your DNA the category of the med [such as benzodiazepines for stress], the brand and generic name of the said drug [Xanax, Ativan, etc], and if your DNA will accept said drug or if there could me a problem with that med.

I had this DNA test for medicines. It showed that I should not take Valium [for stress]... or Warfarin [blood thinner] for when the time comes.... all of the prescription acid reflux medicines on the no list [no wonder none of those drugs had worked for me throughout the years, what a waste of $$].... and to stay away from most of the Statin drugs when that time comes.

Gershun, so surprised that when the doctor wrote out the prescription, via laptop, that a red flag didn't pop up. That is one thing here in the States that all doctors had to computerize their patient files by a certain date so that those files can interact with the ER's, imaging, other doctors, pharmacy, etc. This was part of our Affordable Care Act [Obamacare].

Heck, when my cat needed to take something for his joint pain, because he was on a certain blood pressure pill that wouldn't play havoc with his kidney issues, the Vet knew what he could take, as the normal med usually prescribed wouldn't had been a good match.
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Gershun, I cant find anyplace where you can check up on malpractice suits in Canada. You may not have grounds for a suit yourself unless you cant prove that you suffered an injury by the doc misprescribing.

I'd write a letter to the licensing board of both the doc and the pharmacist. Or better yet, get your lawyer to write.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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One of my pet peeves is Drs. Not knowing the side effects of the drugs they prescribe. But, the pharmacist should have been aware. Don't think suing will help. Very hard to prove negligence. My GF was given a drug that was on her records she couldn't take. It almost killed her. When the hospital doctor (not her PCP) was confronted, he said she asked for it. His word against hers.
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Gershun Jun 2, 2019
I would think a Dr. who had a persons best interests in mind would still not prescribe something that could possibly be harmful whether you asked for it or not.

How naive of me, right?
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As Worried succinctly stated you can go to the State Licensing Board Website & search for any history of discipline on their record. It should definitely be accessible there. Everyone should (the general population) have access to check the status of a health care provider for valid licensure. My state does (MD). Looks like this is available in Canada too.

It is very difficult to prove medical malpractice suits. You have to provide proof the MD was not as prudent as they could have been & he deliberately caused harm due to their lack of due diligence. You will have to prove the long term damage you will will suffer b/o the MD’s actions. Nothing is impossible, but unless you find a malpractice attorney that feels there is merit the attorney signs on with a contract for contingency payment (which you can use to get a feel on how good a case you have).

But definitely look up the providers discipline history via his State Licensing bureau.
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Reply to Shane1124
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These were two different medications, on two different occasions from the same doctor.

Both times he knew what I had been taking and so did the Pharmacy

It wasn't until I had the reactions and went online that I found out about drug interactions.

The doctor knew and the pharmacy know what I am on. If they were doing their job properly they would have caught this before and not given the drugs to me.

Am I planning on suing. I don't know but am curious if he makes a habit of doing this and whether he has ever been sued before
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Tothill Jun 2, 2019
I am sorry you have had this happen. When you followed up with the doctor after you had a reaction what was his response? Did you report them to the pharmacy too?

Unfortunately it is not possible for doctors to know every possible drug interaction. Some may be common and generally known, but others not so much. I remember many years ago (pre internet) my GP having to check a huge tome to review a medication he was going to give me.

even in these days of electronic medical records, not everything will be caught.
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A few things.

1 two different professionals had their hands on the Rx, so I would be questioning both the Doc and the Pharmacist.

2 why didn’t you speak up? You knew you had a reaction in the past.

3 some medications have harsh side effects, but are the only option.

4 was it am allergic reaction? Or a drug interaction?

5 Did the doctor you saw know that you had reacted in the past and did the doc know your current Rx?

Walk in Clinic Docs do not have easy access to Rx history.

6 are you planning a lawsuit? If yes, you have to show that you suffered injury and loss.

Lastly, you can check with your provincial medical association to see if there are complaints against the doctor.

https://www.cpsbc.ca/disciplinary-actions. This is the site for BC.
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Well, I will be doing that for sure. Thank-you for your answer.
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I don't know about canada but in the US one can call the licensing board to inquire as to whether there have been any disciplinary actions enacted by the board.
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Reply to anonymous840695
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Thx worried and faerieflies.

I agree. It's very disconcerting when you put your health in someone's hands and they don't even know what they are doing.
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I'm shocked that both the doctor and the pharmacist would miss a possible drug interaction. Usually the computers will toss out an alarm when they type in the RX. Seems to me you have at least two people and a computer system that need to have their toes to the flames a bit.
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Reply to faeriefiles
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You should be able to contact the medical licensing board to find out. In the US we can check with the county court in the county the physician practices in, i would think it would be the same in canada?
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