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Our grandaughters are sweet, but I want to help them to understand what their "papa John" is going through in a way that does not frighten them.

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How old are the grands? If young....

Always My Grandpa : A Story for Children about Alzheimer's Disease
by Linda Scacco
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Reply to gladimhere
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She1934 Jul 24, 2018
I have ordered this one. Should have it in a few days.
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The 36 Hour Day is a classic. I don't think there is anything too difficult for teens to take in, they are more apt to be frightened by misinformation and uncertainty than anything that helps them understand the true nature of dementia.
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Reply to cwillie
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If you look up "Alzheimer's books for kids" in a search engine of your choice, you will get a nice list of books. You can also look here: www.alzheimers.net/6-03-16-books-for-children-about-alzheimers-and-dementia/

Your friendly former children's librarian!
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Reply to Reader83
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I too just wanted to chime in on giving you kudos for doing this. I didn't think twice about having my young son around my grandmother and I know it has had a bigger positive affect on his life than the relationship with his great-grandmother which was wonderful for both of them. He loved helping to care for her and would take her breakfast tray out to her whenever we visited, I think he was probably around 5 when he started doing this and both she and my mom, who was her caregiver, talked about the vision of this all the time, Mom still does! Now it strikes me just how interesting it is that this vivid "vision" was something my grandmother never forgot and now my mom also still remembers (though it's in the distant past for her so not as surprising). My grandmother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, though we were lucky that it was "mild" and she was able to remain at home with live in help. But my son, the eldest great-grandchild spent lot's of time over the years sitting on the bed and spending time with her, he was never afraid of her or thought any of her medical needs or sometimes hard to follow conversation was anything but natural. All of her great-grandchildren spend time with her sitting and playing on the bed or the floor and as far as I know it was all very natural for them as well, probably because their parents didn't have any reservations about it and the time/interaction was just treated naturally. I think the only thing we all insisted our children do was to say hello and goodbye at both ends of every visit, we didn't force the relationship by requiring they spend time or manufacturing it we let visits happen at everyone's own pace. It just so happened that my grandmother was interesting, interested in each of her grandchildren and great-grandchildren's lives (she asked questions and listened attentively), was never judgmental and generally fun to be around as a child. Thank you She1934 for reminding me of this time, your question has led me down memory lane with a smile on my face.
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She1934 Jul 24, 2018
A beautiful way to bring your family together! Thank you for your words.
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I don’t have a book suggestion, just wanted to say that it’s great to see you wanting to have them better understand and be involved. It’s refreshing to see this reaction vs the all too common shying away and loss of relationship.
When my mom was in nursing home, my children were younger and we took them very frequently. They learned a ton by being in that environment. They remember today with compassion the people who were there, their grandmother among them. My brother wouldn’t take his children, he said it was frightening. I think it only frightened him. Children are much more accepting and resilient than adults. Good for you for wanting more ways to explain.
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She1934 Jul 24, 2018
You are very wise.
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Teens are into the internet so I'd check out Alz.org.
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Reply to SueC1957
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Best place for any info on Alzheimer's is the Alzheimer's Assoc 24/7 Helpline (800-272-3900) Sure they have many suggested readings for all ages.
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My Mom's doctor recommended The 36 Hour Day, 5th Edition. It is a very thorough, helpful book.
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Reply to Lpiano2
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Hands down, The 36 Hour Day is the go to book. There are some great movies out there as well that are good to get a feel for dealing with the disease and how it affects family members: “The Notebook” and “Still Alice” are two that come to mind. Best to you....
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The Bible for this is “The 365 Hour Day”!!!!! Helped all us very much
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