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You can sign POA after your name. POA does not make you a guardian.

Your responsibility financially is to use THEIR money to pay THEIR bills. If they are running short, then figure out why. Maybe they don't need that big cable bill. Or a landline and cell phone. Me, I would keep the landline and get rid of the cell. A friend of mine had both and rarely left her house.

When one is admitted to a facility or hospital, read the paperwork carefully. They are always responsible for their bills. You are signing as a representative not someone that is responsible for payment.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Willid, you would have a " fiduciary" responsibility, which is different from and NOT personal responsibility.   As an example, if you spend his funds frivolously, unwisely, or for yourself, that could be a breach of your fiduciary obligation.    Then you would be accountable, and responsible for breach of your obligations.

Given his debts, you're wise to be concerned now.    If you had to make a choice and allocate funds now between debts and medical obligations, I can understand your concern.    But a question is whether or not he's still making decisions, or are you making them, and allocating funds?

And another question as to obligation for financial responsibility is whether or not your father has Medicare, and a gap or some type of supplemental plan.   Are there specific reasons you're concerned about his potential medical bills?

As OldSailor pointed out, you don't sign ONLY your name.  I signed "GA, pursuant to DPOA dated ….., for (GA's father) and NOT individually." 

Are you familiar with Fiduciary responsibilities?  If not, post back and I'll find some resources for you to read.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Willid11 Sep 4, 2019
Not really. I would appreciate any resources you could send....My dad does make his own financial decisions. He refuses to allow myself or siblings to help him better manage his bills. Dad frequently calls & says he needs money now or needs medications he can't afford, or doesn't have money to buy groceries. He has Medicare advantage with a supplement. I realize that he doesn't have a lot of extra funds, but has enough to pay his bills....if he chose to do so. It's just easier to call & ask for it.
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As guardian for my DW I was told and read if I signed anything I was to include the phrase " guardian for Luz". This was supposed to relieve me as being held financially responsible for her debts. So far it has worked and she passed away in March.
I think if I were you I would consult with an elder care attorney in your area on this.
The rules may be different in your area.
You may have the ability to use your POA to spend your LO's fund for care but not obligated to send your own funds.
Please check with legal professionals.
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Reply to OldSailor
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Willid11 Sep 4, 2019
Thanks for your advice!
I believe you are correct that I should seek legal advice.
Regards..
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No. POA never assumes financial responsibility. They only have the power and the obligation to make decisions. A financial POA doesn’t make you financially responsible.
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Reply to worriedinCali
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It depends. Durable Power of Attorney includes financial as well as health care power of attorney. What do you have? Need more info in order to answer your post.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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Willid11 Aug 31, 2019
My parents are divorced with only a minimal sum of monthly social security. My father has significant debt. My concern is that if I sign forms for him upon hospital admission "consent to treat" or assume the role of POA that I could be obligated to financial responsibility for his medical bills
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POA can be for medical or financial or both or everything under the sun. It depends on how it is written.
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