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I am familiar with nursing homes and I have been visiting one home in particular for the past 11 years so I consider my self some what aware of 'the going's on this particular home.
in this home there are registered nurses, lpn's and cca's (bottom of the pole helpers as cca's are known as sometimes.
the rn's at this home are quiet, helpful , cooperative. all the good things about the medical field
the cca's are quiet, keep to themselves are helpful when you need help. they are nice people.
however the lpn's are give off an air of being superior, snobbish,and having disdain to anyone who questions their work. also the lpn's are noisy (almost like a party atmosphere at work.
does anyone agree with my analogy or is all this my imagination? thanks

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I think generalizing about anybody is dangerous. An LPN is a person first, profession second. Someone can be irritating and act superior no matter what they do for a living.
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Fact..

This is a stereotypical question..(attitude)

If I had a nursing license I would be insulted...
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When people in the workplace act " superior" it is sometimes a cover for lack of self-worth. Unless this is affecting the care of the patient, it shouldn't matter.

If there is raucous noisemakers that is disturbing to your patient, have a word with the person in charge.
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Thanks for that wonderful story, Jeanne.
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The LPN I knew personally was my aunt Ethel. In her youth she worked in a mental institution (which we don't have anymore). She then raised her family on a farm. She moved into town and worked as an aide in the local care center. She was widowed at age 60. Her youngest son was starting college that fall ... and she did, too! She used the insurance money to earn her LPN degree. (She lived in the dorm in the winter, to avoid driving. Can you imagine?) Several people advised her, "Ethel, with the small hourly increase you'll get as an LPN you'd have to work to age 90 to break even on your tuition!" But she went ahead. She loved her work at the care center and she knew they desperately needed more nursing staff. When she had her license she could help in ways that she couldn't as an aide. The increase in her wages wasn't the point.

Did she have airs of superiority? She was the oldest of 7 children and mother of 5. Such people do tend to have an "I'm in charge here" attitude, but I doubt very much that she was snobbish before or after she got that degree. She was a wonderful person who sincerely cared about the welfare of the residents of that care center.

If you know 3 LPNs, you know 3 LPNs -- and not enough to generalize about the whole profession.
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Gosh in my Mom's nursing home I can't tell the RN's from the LPN's from the Aides. I have never run into any problems with any of the Staff but then I know what they are doing is very hard work. One time I heard one staff member say "Lord give me strength" and I can understand why. The staff was trying to get all the residents to bed and every now and then one would escape into the hallway, another not take their meds, refuse to go to bed, refuse a bath, etc.

One time I was in the unit when dinner was being served. It was like herding cats trying to get everyone to sit at their table. Food was going everywhere. The staff was trying to help those who had to be hand fed. Not to be funny, it was like watching 4 year olds trying to eat, and there were 30 of them.
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This was a bit baffling to me. LPN is not an advanced degree. It is the bare minimal in nursing, so I've not seen anyone put on airs about it. I have seen two distinct types of nurses, though, when I was helping with a MSN program in a school where I worked. Some of the BSNs were super nice and loved their jobs. OTOH, some of the were people that would have made me flee my hospital room if I ever saw them come in the door. They had such bad attitudes and talked bad of their patients.

So it may not be the fact they are LPNs, but just their personalities.
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Caperguy, I have seen it suggested on this site to bring the cupcakes and donuts to the staff, ' if you want to be part of the party.'
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Can I ask why that matters unless they treat your family member poorly? Do you have to be friendly, do you have to question their work?
What you have noticed is probably true from what you have observed, so trust yourself. Try not to over-generalize to the entire lvn/lpn population.
As far as it concerns you, be at peace with all persons.
Hope this is helpful to you.
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I only have experience itch one nursing home up close and personal. I didn't know an LPN from the Activities Assistant. All were helpful. How do you happen to know who's who? And by knowing, I wonder if you treat them differently.

Nonetheless, I marine it depends more on the particular people than their titles.
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Experience at one nursing home doesn't support a conclusion as to LPN's elsewhere. Your experience and observations are anecdotal at best. Perhaps there's friction at this particular NH between staff, perhaps LPN's are getting an unfair share of the workload and/or are understaffed. Anything not apparent to a visitor could cause a variety of perceived attitudes.

None of these folks working at NHs are in situations where working conditions are ideal, including the interactions with patients and their families.

But even if your conclusions were justified, to what end is they made and why is it relevant, as long as your loved one is getting good care?
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