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Although,I have been taking care of him in my home for the past 3 years while he was diagnosed with epilepsy.......... I read somewhere where you cannot be a caregiver to your spouse and just wondering if this would still be considered under that factor although we are not in a relationship just share 2 kids together.

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PamZ is right, if he is disabled and on SSDI, the kids would collect too!
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were you married? How old are the kids? They may qualify for some aid if they are young ( health insurance, food assistance) If he is disabled he should also quailfy for some help.. to help with the household things. And if you are unemployed you should also look into aid and assistance (or whatever it is called in your area) I am not sure him being your "ex" would affect state aid? Being paid for being his caregiver is probably not going to happen, but there is aid out there for low income, disability, etc..
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aigbefam, wait a minute, you are a caregiver to your ex, but when you are working outside of the home your ex is the caregiver to the children? If your ex is able to take care of the children, why would he need a full-time caregiver? Just wondering.
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No, you won't get paid. It might be better to get him to a group home setting so you can keep a job and build your own future.
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I am speaking in the terms or payment? his epilpsy does restrict him from driving and while losing memory of a lot of regular daily thing I am dealing with paperwork remembering his appointments have already been let go from a few jobs due to him having episodes while im gone and him being the one who looks after the kids. I am just wondering if I am going to keep having to be let go from jobs or can i just get paid for this and be able to take care of him fully.
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Please be more specific as to what you mean by "qualify"?

Anyone can be a caregiver, be it a spouse, significant other, brother, sister, parents, ex, friend.
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I have two questions. First is why you would need to be considered a caregiver. Is it for payment purposes? Second is if he needs a caregiver. I know epilepsy can vary in its severity for different people. Many people with mild epilepsy have trouble working, so can qualify for disability, but can still handle most of the matters of their lives. Is your friend's epilepsy serious enough that he needs a caregiver to do things other than drive?
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