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I am talking about if I am going to provide caregiving service in the client’s home, do I need insurance so I don’t get personally sued if the client falls or gets hurt while under my care?

I’d be doing this on my own, not for a company.

I’m even willing to volunteer in my neighborhood for a few hours respite here & there but was discouraged for doing so in case the elderly person gets hurt (then “they can sue the caretaker”)

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An LLC could provide protection against acts of your employees, but not your own acts. You could still be sued personally for something you do.
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You need to see an attorney. The attorney  can set up an LLC that will protect your personal assets if you are sued. You also need to speak to your insurance agent. You need liability insurance, and probably an increase on your homeowner’s to protect in case of an accident or fire. There are numerous dangers inherent to caregiving. I would also make sure your  health insurance coverage is good. Hurting yourself is very easy - especially back injuries if helping an elder with ambulation or transfers.
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The issues you raise are specifically why working through a company is safer.

What type of care specifically will you be providing for this client? Some tasks are more risky than others. I found an excellent private duty company, licensed, insured, good reputation, but the nurse who made the initial assessment declined to arrange for dysphagia services b/c of the liability.

If you want to help out with respite care, contact your county. Ours makes arrangements for respite care, through the county resources, so insurance coverage is in place.

I would consider it potentially catastrophic to volunteer for respite care w/o adequate insurance protection.
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Jessie, it would be best for your to speak to your insurance carrier to see what is needed, such as an umbrella policy that can cover $1M, such policies are inexpensive.

Now, if you will be an "employee" for a client, it would be up to that client to have workman's comp policy in case you get hurt on the job. Not many people know about this.
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