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Why would they want to enact if they can make their own decisions?
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Reply to JoAnn29
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As long as a person is competent, they can enact an irrevocable power of attorney. They’re rare and usually used for businesses. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to consult an attorney.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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You need to look at the Irrevocable POA document itself as that should state how to enact the I-POA or when the I-POA goes into effect.  Also, you need to review the POA laws for the state that the I-POA is written in and effective in.  Each state has slightly different laws, regulations and guidelines regarding POAs.
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Reply to DeeAnna
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