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I was going to refer to what shakingthedustoff said about the current advice of not showering everyday. I live in FL, though, where walking to the mailbox and back results in a full sweat! I recently bought some of the disposable "showers" and use them to freshen up during the day. I think they would work wonderfully for people who are unable to shower as often as they are accustomed to doing. Another point I would like to make about the elderly and hygiene. While my mother lived in an ALF, she began to have an offensive odor. I knew how meticulous she was about personal care and appearance, so I thought she might be depressed and not care about taking care of herself. The owner of the ALF even mentioned it to me, which embarrassed me for mom and myself. She assured me that she was showing and doing everything she always did. Soon after the odor problem, she was hospitalized with a high fever and unexplained pain. As I was sitting by her bed after her first day in the hospital, with no explanation for her condition, I noticed the bag from her catherater. Her urine was extremely dark! I asked the nurse if she had the results of mom's urinalysis. When she checked, there had been no urinalysis ordered nor done. When they ran one, she had a urinary tract infection. They started her on antibiotics and hydrated her, and her condition improved AND the bad odor disappeared. It is a good idea for the people who are close to the person experiencing something that smells like the result of poor hygiene to notice the color of the urine and the intake of fluids. I know that should be part of the care we pay for in facilities and hospitals, but the reality is that it doesn't always happen. This wasn't the only time I was right when I told the doctors what I thought was wrong with mom. After several hours and numerous tests in the ER one night, the doctor said it turned out that "Dr. Daughter" was right. We are the ones who see them most often and know when things are not right. A change in body odor or breath can often be symptoms of a medical problem. Back to the original topic, I hope some of you try the disposable wipes and "showers." Some baby powder is always refreshing, too. I am sure some of the elderly dread shower time because of balance or other problems. I think they will welcome a way to feel refreshed without anxiety.
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Is that what you are talking about? The website has other caregiver items, too. ahttps://www.cloroxcareconcepts.com/products/bathing-wipes/

Sounds like a good option.
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At the memory care unit my is in, they use them with the more advanced residents. The nurse told us that it is not necessary to wash their entire body one day..but they will wash the arms and torso one day then the lower half the next day.. I think for their hair they use a dry no rinse shampoo. My mom can still shower herself. You can get the adult no rinse wash clothes at drugstores or target and walmart or at Amazon.
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I guess hair washing would still be needed, but these sound like a safe and stress less alternative. Bathing seems to be most caregivers most difficult chore.
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