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It would entail that I move to his very rural location, and live in relative isolation in his decrepit and rather inaccessible house.

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I just thought of something that you might could make. Take photographs and enlarge them, then glue them to heavy duty cardstock. Take your scissors and cut into fairly large jigsaw pieces. They don't have to completely interlock. Place them into an envelope and paste a completed picture on the front of the envelope. Viola! A puzzle that Dad could put together and enjoy looking at the family pictures.
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Move in, no but I would expect you to visit him at least once a week, maybe over night to give your sister a break. Bipolar can be managed with meds. Disability is no excuse for not keeping him company. Go, be there or regret it later, wishing you had.
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The best thing you can do to help, is to help yourself. Make sure to stay in treatment for your bipolar disorder and don't let it stress your already overburdened sister. My answer was also not to make you feel inadequate. Bipolar is a terrifying disease but it really takes its toll on those around you. Best thing you can do to help all others is to concentrate on caring for yourself!
Angel
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Oh, I'm sorry, I really wasn't trying to make you feel bad, honest.

It was good of you to offer and I understand your frustration. Can you be helpful without moving in? Do you live close enough to relieve her for a day or two every now and then? One or two days can be such a relief for a full time caregiver, and might not be too much for you to handle. If nothing else, maybe you could supervise temporary home health aides while Sister takes a break.

Not knowing any other facts about the situation, I wonder if you could do emotional support. Send cards and letters to Dad frequently. Set up Facetime or something on the computer where you can talk to Dad. There will be times when a piece of equipment or medicine or procedure might need to be researched. Sitting in front of the computer or making phone calls might be something you could do. Maybe you could make a memory book of photos and stories for Dad to look at. I'll keep thinking and let you know if anything else comes to mind.
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Send your dad and her funny cards, thank you for her, chatty stuff for dad. Call dad once a week. Encouage your siblings to provide respite.
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Thank you! I realize that it would be difficult, and may become harder for my sister who cannot rely on me for much physical help. Largely because of my bipolar condition and short temper with family, my sister has turned down my offer to help. Now, I am left feeling inadequate in both my physical and emotional state! I'll try to help her, but because of my disability/ies, my cooperation may be more laborious for my sister.

Because our other siblings can't/won't help her, she will continue to be our father's solo caregiver. As I'm unable to offer any financial support, can anyone tell me other ways in which I can help?
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Personally, I wouldn't. Mainly because of the reasons you listed and also I wonder how much help you will be for your sister. Eventually it may work out where she's taking care of all of you and it will wear her out.

It is a nice gesture to offer to help, because a lot of time siblings intentionally leave all the care giving to one. But without knowing what your physical disability is, I can't see you being able to help lift, transfer, bathe, cook, clean...all those things that go along with caring for the aged. And having had experience with bipolar disease, I know that sometimes it isn't kept under control.
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This seems like a no brainer to me...The answer is no.
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