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This is a question for some of the Europeans on the site. The only knowledge I have of your system is from that Sicko movie. Is your system as positive as it is portrayed?

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Most European countries, as well as Canada, have single payer systems where everyone is entitled to basic health care. Some, like England, (not sure about other countries) have the option of private pay for those who want it and have the money.

The US system private pay as JoAnn29 said, though now there are options for those who were denied insurance because of pre-existing conditions.

No system is perfect since the cost of health care has exploded around the world. No system is without problems. As JoAnn said, in countries where there is universal health care, there is generally a longer wait for elective surgery.

As in the US, with private pay, countries with universal health systems are fighting to keep prices down. I get letters from caregivers in the US, Canada, the UK, Germany, Australia and other countries and they almost all complain about the struggles of caring for elders and feel that more services are needed. It's tough all over.
Carol
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Think you might have to do some research yourself. Here's a place to start: http://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/issue-briefs/2015/oct/us-health-care-from-a-global-perspective
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Danamovedon, the charts on US spending is amazing. When I was doing tax info for my exes parents earlier in the year, I was amazed that BCNAdvantage in MI, spent almost $192,000 in claims on one of them and $76,000 on the other. Then Medicaid picked up about another $90,000. The costs of healthcare in the US is ridiculous.
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Looks like not many overseas people on the list. I can explain a little the difference between the US and England. If I'm wrong people feel free to correct me. Our system is private insurers and private facilities. The government does not regulate our health system unlike England where the government does. They have socialized medicine. I understand that while you work money is deducted from your pay for your health needs. Upon retirement you no longer pay but are entitled to healthcare. Like our HMOs, you pick a primary doctor. This doctor is allowed a certain amount of patients and is paid according to the number he has no matter how often he sees them. Elective surgery can take months to have done.
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Thank you for the information. I was wondering in terms of education and drug standards, are European countries on par with the US?
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When you say European you are painting a pretty wide swath, there are a lot of countries in Europe, around 50 (from Wiki). Of those nearly 30 are in the EU. I would include most of those in the ranks of first world countries, so although their health care practices may be radically different from the ones we are used to the standard of care should still be high.
I have often wondered why it seems so difficult to get good comparative health info from other countries. I realize there is a language barrier but that can't be the only reason. When there is a political debate about healthcare I am always curious about what exactly other nations have tried, what has worked and what hasn't. There have to have been a million studies done on this, but it seems like every new government keeps trying to reinvent the wheel.
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Another interesting article: https://www.aei.org/publication/europeans-spending-little-health-care-compared-us/
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Medicare nicely covers serious hospitalization such as strokes, heart attacks. Don't know where we'd be without it.
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