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Shoot- I answered this a year ago w/o reading the whole question!
Medicaid is quite different than Medicare (with rider policies). I know that Mother had Medicare and one rider policy. Even with that, she was placed in a facility that was not nice, not private--hence the meltdown and us placing her in a posh rehab and wealthy sis picking up the difference.
Had she been on MEDICAID in UT she wouldn't have had the choice. They would look at a family's ability to "pay up" and not have allowed this.
A totally different dynamic, for sure. I'm sorry if I misled anyone.
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My mom was offered a private room on another floor in her NH recently. The social worker pushed for it..as my mom had a few unlucky incidents with roommates, for mixed reasons. I wasn't sure she would do well alone - she is very social- but the private room definitely feels a bit more like home since you don't have to sleep next to a stranger and look at their stuff. The jury is still out though in whether it was worth it to move from a floor she was used to..it's only been a week and she's still adjusting to her new surroundings. Do we ever really know what the right choice is?
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My mom was offered a private room on another floor in her NH recently. The social worker pushed for it..as my mom had a few unlucky incidents with roommates, for mixed reasons. I wasn't sure she would do well alone - she is very social- but the private room definitely feels a bit more like home since you don't have to sleep next to a stranger or look at their stuff. The jury is still out as to if it was worth the move from a familiar floor..she is still adjusting to her surroundings. Do we ever know if we make the right choice. What do you think..would you choose a private room for your loved one if they had to move to another floor? It wasn't a "great" floor, but it was familiar.
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Mother was in a NH for rehab that had originally "sold itself" to her by telling her she would be a in a lovely, private room. Imagine the day she moved to it and was in a clean, but dull, semi private with a resident who had clearly been there for years? Mother was livid, and we were finally able to step in an move her to a very posh all-private room NH. My sister just picked up the tab of the difference between the two places. There was no problem--and we're getting ready to do this again--this time Mother has shopped better and is going to a rehab place she knows and has stayed in before. I'm in UT, and this was legal here, but I cannot speak for other states. No attorneys involved, sis just paid the difference at discharge.
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I agree with BRDrose. definitely consult with an Elderlaw attorney. It may be possible to set up some type of special need trust which is funded by you and your siblings to provide the extras which you would like your mother to have. It all depends on the state you live in. Good Luck. I wish more Nursing Homes would encourage clients to seek Elder Law attorneys before the client has spend private funds down to medicaid level.
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Check with your Area Agency of Aging in Nebraska. They should be able to answer your question or refer to someone who has updated info. The rules are changing all the time in every state.
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in NE can a medicaid person in a nursring home pay the difference to be put in a private room
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How is Medicaid funded? Taxpayer dollars. All of us would have to pay more in taxes than we already do for the luxury of a private room.
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Situation: Mom in nursing home, semi. Wants private. If family contributes the money for the private, does that go into the formula for calculating her eligibility for Medicaid?
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In some states all nursing homes are legally required to accept medicaid as a payment. I recommend seeing an elder law attorney. They will know if your state requires the facility to accept medicaid (facilities often don't disclose this so they will have more private payers) and make sure she gets to stay after her money runs out.
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sorry typing fast before work, forgive my spelling.
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It would be great if all nursing home rooms could be private. I agree that is hard to share a room, especially with someone you don't even know. I also think it must be hard for the person when their roommate becomes ill or passes on. My Aunt likes having a roommate, but I think she is one in a million who do. She went from home to marriage, after my uncle's death to sharing a house with her daughter, then her sister, and then to the home. When she was in a private room she would
sleep in the chair in other peoples room. LOL She know shares a room and is happier. I hope it all works out for you. I don't know why Medicaid is that way. Down here in Texas they are very strict.
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Thank-you for your understanding answer. Being made to share a room is a terrible position to have to put our loved ones into. Actually--they don't have even a "room"--they have to compact their lifetaime belongings into 1/2 a room. It is not living, it is existing. The congressman I've been in contact with is, fortunately, very understanding and willing to listen. I actually ran into him in the grocery store around Thanksgiving and he asked if I wanted to have coffee and visit. I did--but I also had to be back home in time to get my granddaughter from day care so did not have time to take advantage of his offer. I was really disappointed. He also visits the NH where my mom is sometimes and I'm hoping when he comes around again I can go out and visit with him. While he is only one person with one vote by making him aware of the problems maybe he can influence others. Thanks again for your reply--Sincerely--Flustered
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Hope it works out, flustered! I am with you; I think its crap to "make" elders share a room in a nursing home. They've already given up so much, have compacted their whole lives into one measly room and on top of that, have to share this limited space with a total stranger! And heaven forbid the roommate is not compatible.

Good for you for letting your congressman know about this problem. Too many politicians or "powers-that-be" have no idea or appreciation for what it means to move a loved one into the long term care system. They design policies and take actions that they have no appreciation for how it affects people. Of course, some of these rich folks will never place their loved one in nursing home...they won't need to since they can afford other options! Its maddening!

Keep me posted on how things work out...and let me know the logistics and/or outcomes!
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Thank-you for all your help and advise. I appreciate it. Right now, in Iowa, many NH are trying to provide more private rooms and I think the new ones--or ones being built are providing more too. Sharing a room is the pits for persons who are still of sound mind and somewhat able to get around. I've been "bugging" my congressman and will tell anyone who holds still long enough to listen what I think of making persons share a room. While some (few) say their relative doesn't mind having a roommate, just ask persons who aren't in a NH how they would feel having to share their life with someone laying in the same room. I know there is nothing any of you can do, but it is good to "vent" sometimes. Fortunately my daughter found an article on the wed that says a law was enacted in Iowa , in 2011 I think, allowing the family to pay the difference. Of course there are many hoops to jump through. I spent two hours on the phone this am and only got to talk to one person who could directly answer a question for me. So I don't know yet, for sure if we can pick up the slack for mom or not, but I'm trying. Thanks again
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In Texas, Medicaid also views this as a no-no. Whatever you would pay then, medicaid would want you to pay towards their care, or they could count as income, and then it might disqualify them for Medicaid. You always have to be very careful with Medicaid. Also most nursing homes have very few rooms that are private.
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In NY, that's a no-go. Medicaid would view the ability for family to pay the difference as "proof" (sorry, that's probably not the best word, but I haven't had coffee yet!) that funds exist for the resident, and therefore, why should the government provide aid if family members can? Of course, you and I know there's a big difference between coming up with an extra $200 a month for a loved one and coming up with the thousands it would cost out of pocket if Medicaid weren't supplementing. But unfortunately, at least around here in NY, Medicaid doesn't see it that way.
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Does this have to be in a Medicaid facility? Our mom is in a private pay facility right now. It would be nice to keep her there even after the money runs out. Currently O.E. is not a Medicaid facility. Moving her would be too dramatic. Our plan is to have her run down her savings money, her income money from SS, Vets, and pension totals about $3100 per month. Any ideas or realities.
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This may vary by state, but it is probably up to the nursing home. The one my mom is in (NC) would let us have a private room (were one available - there's a huge waiting list though) - and we could pay the difference between the Medicaid rate the private room rate. In our case, this would be around $600 a month. My three sibs and I will split the cost four ways.
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