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I need to explain to my Sis that while Mother gave her rights to sign for medical treatments this is not the same as having the POA. Sis stated to a AL employee that she had POA but she doesn't. Mother has never signed and notarized any form for POA only the Medical directives and assignment which only requires a simple witness signature. I think because Mother has Sis' name on her financial accounts that is enough. Help me explain the difference better!

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There aredifferent types of POAs, so you could start with that. One type is for financial purposes. Your sister can sign on accounts where it's set up with her name, but that won't cover any other financial business that needs to be taken care of. It sounds like the form for health that's been signed is just the HIPAA form so that her heath information can be released to your sister. Again, a full health directive, or POA for health will be needed should decisions of life vs. death or any heavy duty treatment be needed.

You can download these forms from the Internet, but if you do be certain that you get one that is state specific. Then they must be signed and notarized. It's generally safer to have an attorney draw up both POAs, with the health directive containing the correct HIPAA language needed.
If your sister won't listen to you, then call an elder attorney and ask if they have brochures that tell why such form are needed.
Good luck,
Carol
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You are correct Carol she has the HIPAA and a health directive has been signed, apparently neither needed a notary in California? I guess the info I need is what "other financial business" would need a notarized POA? My husband has a notarized POA for his Mom but she has annuities, stock, income property. My mother literally has 2 small bank accounts as joint tenant with Sis. If I can give some examples Sis she might see why Mother should sign a formal POA. For example, forms and contract to enter a Board & Care facility would require Sis to have a formal POA, right?
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