Dentures or natural teeth?

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I still have most of mine, but two root canals in one year makes me ask if giving up the fight is smart. Have you gotten dentures? What are the pros and cons? My grandmother said that she loved them because she could eat ice cream without pain. But I wonder, do they reduce your enjoyment of eating?

I'm thinking that dentures would be cheaper over the long term, because once they are made and then successfully fitted, there should be no more expense except keeping them clean.

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Get them cleaned every 3 months. Isn't it sad that people can't afford to go to dentist. The 60 something did not even floss. No one did. I don't think they even had floss in the 60's.
Save your teeth. I have bone loss from TMJ. I can't imagine trying to fit dentures. Some dentist invest in milling machines, They take out the bad part and then use porcelain overlays to cover the tooth. All my molars except the front have them. The front have bonding in front. I have bone loss. From bad bite from dental work. Find a good dentist. Ask your doctor or someone with nice teeth, who they use. I asked my neurologist. I had mine done in 2006. Best investment I've ever made. I would rather have my teeth and health than material possessions. I hate pain.
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This post tops all. I know a woman (age 55 and more than a little nuts) had let her teeth go to the point where they were poisoning her body! After 2-3 years of this, she had the remaining 15 of them extracted. So she had no teeth at all. But she continued to eat ALL solid food on her gums!! I tried to tell her "Terri, if you continue to chew on just gums, they will be so inflamed that you won't be able to have dentures." She never listened to a word of any of this!
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I answered on this, but an experience this week really solidified my belief that should work hard to keep as many natural teeth as you can.

Had lunch with a group of friends from HS. We all turn 60 this year. One gal, I have noticed, began letting her teeth "go" in her late 40's. She'd just let the rot, literally right out of her mouth. I'd see her twice, maybe 3 times a year and they got worse and worse. Along with the grossness of looking at broken, brown, rotting teeth, her breath could stop a train.

She evidently got dentures sometime in the past 6 months. They do not fit well, they look VERY fake and are too big for her mouth. She can barely talk and she looks older than she did with few teeth. She can't eat with them in, so she surreptitiously slipped them out to eat. Then snuck them back in at the end of the meal.

I don't say this to be mean--I felt horrible for her. She has money, healthcare, etc., her lack of dental care was by choice. Even in HS she rarely brushed her teeth--and now she's paying the price. She looks 80..and not a happy, healthy 80. I know her teeth decaying has caused her a lot of health problems.

Take care of your natural teeth as long as you possibly can!!!! She still could have saved a lot of hers and gotten implants--but opted to go the full upper and lower route. Maybe her dentist is lousy, but my intuition tells me she has lost a lot of bone structure and these things are never going to look good.
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False teeth are no good. Keep your own teeth. You will really regret it if you have your perfectly good teeth removed.
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My sister-in-law was being made ill by the mercury fillings in her teeth.
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Partsmom: Teeth with mercury fillings are not extracted. The mercury fillings are taken out by a process that a specialized dentist does by capturing the mercury vapors. Then the specialized dentist replaces the fillings with the right material. The worse to do is to get dentures!
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I had mercury amalgam fillings in all the molars when I was a kid, and never had any problems with them for over 50 years except for one that cracked and the tooth was crowned. I figured that not disturbing them was better than messing with the mercury. I had trouble with the gums after a couple of years on statin drugs. I remember in the days when antibiotics were not as common, I knew several older people with chronic ill health that were cured by having their teeth removed. My dad had had gum problems fairly young and had dentures as long as I can remember; never seemed to have a problem with them.
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One thing a little off topic, but still on the topic of teeth. My sister-in-law had a lot of old mercury fillings because her parents had a total of 6 kids and the only time they went to the dentist was to lose a tooth. She then left the family home at high school graduation and then got the bad mercury fillings. She recently had those removed as they were going into her body and making her very ill. She had to go to a specialized dentist, who captured the "mercury vapors" when the fillings were replaced.
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Thunder--In turn thanks for providing your experience. As you said, people have different experiences.

Years ago I mentioned to a hygienist that I had a few fillings that were several decades old, and I got a rather dumbfounded response of "really??" I suspect a lot of the dental work done these days has more to do with cosmetic considerations rather than permanence.
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Keep the natural teeth as long as possible. Try most anything to keep the teeth. My friend had implants put in and that worked out for her but dentures no way.
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