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Mom is 90 yrs old. She started showing significant signs of the dementia about 3 months ago... now, she falls at least once a week (bones are very strong), can't get her words out to make sense sometimes, can't remember what she is doing, can't pay her bills, tries to cook but burns everything, set the frying pan on fire once but almost the second time within an hour, etc. It seems like major changes daily. Is this normal? Dr. is pretty sure it is Vascular Dementia but we opted to not do any testing due to her age.

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If all else is normal, then I would go for a definitive diagnosis (or as definitive as you can get) on the dementia. If it is another type or a combination of types, there might be medications that can slow down the progression.
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Takecare, sorry for your situation. It is scary. I think that VD is particularly unpredictable. I learned to never expect anything. Once things seemed to be stable, then they weren't.

I'd ensure that she isn't cooking or handling household appliances, never left alone, sharp things removed, medication and cleaners, like bleach out of her reach, etc. Just like toddler proofing a house.

Regarding the falls....my LO had so many falls and fractures, she eventually went to a wheelchair and that was actually an improvement. She was able to scoot around the facility in her wheelchair safely. She could barely get around with her her walker, so the wheelchair added her much more mobility and safety. Most of her falls stopped then.
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Dr did blood work and test for UTI...all is normal so just the dementia. It was very slow for a year or two when we first noticed things but the past 3 months have been crazy!! Nearly every day she says something or does something so off the wall for her. Stresses me out!!
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Of course, discuss it with her doctor, but, my LO's Vascular dementia did progress fast at some points. It was so gradual at first that we didn't know what it was. We just thought she was being spiteful, selfish, lazy and mean, but, later, it became more apparent, when she did suffer more falls, fractures, and could no longer manage her own care or run her household.

I'd have them rule out other things, but, my LO was falling several times per week too, in the AL. It was due to extremely poor balance. She would tip over standing right at her walker. I had her evaluated by a Neurologist, to confirm her primary's VD diagnosis. He ordered MRI and it confirmed multiple strokes and confirmed severe VD.

I wanted the tests to make sure it wasn't something else. She was only 62 at the time.
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Staaarr is right. My mother’s UTI manifested itself in confusion, babbling and delusions and progressed to combative behavior while in the hospital. She did have dementia and the UTI brought it right to the surface. When she was in the hospital for the infection, she had psychological testing and was diagnosed. The social worker told me it was determined by the results that she could no longer live on her own. Eventually, the nursing home staff suggested she be tested every month for a UTI. I never knew how badly one could affect an elderly person until my mom had one.
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Yes check for a U.T.I ! Also the low Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium testing. It seems crazy but if 1 of these things gets out of wack, it looks like super fast progression in my mother every time.
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Definitely not normal. Vascular dementia doesn't necessarily have to get any worse if the factors causing it are controlled, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. It sounds to me as though she may have a urinary tract infection, low sodium or some other type of infection causing it to seem as though her dementia has gotten worse quickly. Most dementias are slow even when progressive. Get her checked out immediately by a doctor. It is amazing how a simple UTI can mimic severe dementia with absolutely no other symptoms.
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