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My mom started a low dose of Depakote on top of a medium dose Lexapro and Remeron. She had been on the latter two but really declined in mobility and speaking ability after the Depakote started. She's now in a wheelchair which is safer (less fall risk) but it is so hard to see the speech decline. All of it was happening before Depakote, but it seems to have accelerated it. At any rate, the medicine is really helping her cope better, but would like to hear how long others have cared for their loved ones after speech is gone or nearly gone. Thanks for sharing your journey.

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pamstegma- Thanks for sharing your experience with your mom's meds/speech. I realize that stroke patients have similar struggles. It wasn't clear to me if your mom was a dementia patient as well? I'm really curious how dementia patients progress in speech loss.
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No I can't say that meds ever affected mom's speech. She talked constantly, even after strokes. She just made less sense.
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Again, interested in experiences with speech loss in dementia patients, not as a predictor, rather, caregivers observations on how long their loved ones experienced this symptom and if meds seemed to play a part in it. I know that nonverbal communication and appropriate, comforting touch is important. Just other's experiences is what I'd appreciate hearing.
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My mom had a stroke in 2013 which has affected her speech, including her ability to use gesture to communicate (for example, when she wants her neck rubbed, she opens her mouth and points into it; dumb me, I think she's hungry! She pointing at her neck!).

Her speech swings widely, from a few fluent words to nothing at all. It's very discouraging, both for her and for us. But it doesn't seem to be a predictor of ANYTHING at all.
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they could shut the h*ll up at the age of 15 and the world would be a more serene place .
kidding .. my aunt doesnt speak much any more ( 92 yrs old ) . and its increasingly difficult to have a meaningful visit with her ..
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My question was not to use the loss of speech as an indicator for life expectancy, but rather, to hear what others have experienced with it in dementia patients specifically. Some caregivers have told me their loved one never lost speech, while many others did see a loss that lasted for years. Just interested in the duration that others experienced, and if meds appeared to accelerate symptoms.
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Loss of speech can occur anytime after a stroke, and it is not really a good indicator of life expectancy. Loss of appetite and weight loss would give you a better idea.
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