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His body is 30 years older than his mind! But he has limited vision, limited hearing, walks with a walker, and has a bit of difficulty with speech after a stroke several years back.

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I would think that he could play bingo, go to the piano concerts, perhaps church services, and maybe play a few board games. He has to try. Will he enjoy baseball season, once the games are on tv?
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These are all great tips -- thank you. I'm going to go meet with the Assisted Living Manager today. He is in a fabulous facility and I know they have encouraged him to get involved. We have gotten him audio books and he seems to enjoy them. I think the main problem is he hasn't found a friend that he can have a one on one intellectually stimulating conversation with. I'm going to check with my pastor and see if there's someone who might stop in to visit him to talk. Either my sister or I go by daily, but maybe we should preplan a topic to discuss rather than just fuss over him!
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Get to know the activity directors (called Community Life staff at my mom's place.) See if together you can pick out some scheduled activities to get Dad involved in. Bingo? Cards? Men's Club? Sing-alongs, discussions of the news, movie night all are possibilities. The staff person should be able to figure out how to make activities accessible for Dad. One woman who always plays bingo is totally blind, but a volunteer sits with her and she gets a kick out of knowing how close she is to bingo and in winning prizes. Usually the exercise programs include things that can be done seated. Care centers are usually pretty creative in making their activities inclusive for those with limitations.

It may help if you or another family member goes with him to a few activities to start, and then just allow rounding him up and bringing him to the staff.

Would he enjoy audio books and magazines, do you think? Might he be able to hear them OK with a headset? If his mind is still active he might enjoy that. Once while I was hospitalized I was not able to read (temporarily, thank goodness!) and a friend brought me a few audio books. Saved my sanity!
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I found that mom enjoys sorting and counting loose change. It makes her feel productive, and she always feels "rich" when she gets done. We save up all our coins and when we suspect she's bored, out comes the bowl and her face lights up! We line up one coin from each denomination, and she lines the coins up along that pattern. When she's done sorting, she tries to count it. That's the fun part. Did you know that the number 7 comes after number 9?
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How long has your Dad been living in assisted living? If it has been a short time, he probably hasn't felt comfortable making new friends [buddies]. Once he finds someone that has the same interest he does, then it would make it easier.
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Talk to the staff. There is no reason for him to be bored in an ALF. He may be trying to get sympathy, but he is actually doing well when you are not there. We caught mom having fun by showing up unexpectedly.
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