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My mother has advanced Parkinsons. She can't walk without assistance and that involves a gait belt and help in maneuvering the walker for less than 2 minutes. She can't seem to find shoes that fit or are comfortable anymore. It's becoming a never ending saga. They are too tight or too loose and can be the same shoes. One day they're too tight and the next day they're falling off. Or the next day the shoes are too heavy. Since she has limited mobility,she insists on buying shoes through catalogs. We all have told her that she needs to go to the shoe store in person and stop ordering shoes through the catalogs. The type of shoes she wants are sneaker type shoes with traction. Is it coming to a point where she can't wear shoes? I can't even count how many times I have returned shoes in the past 6 months. UUGH

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You should try shoes that have stretch fabric material because they will stretch to the persons foot
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Dr. Comfort are also good shoes, especially if she's diabetic. Most medical supply houses carry them. My mom had to give up the "fashionable" shoes long ago and only wears these now. They're pricey but Medicare can help pay if a Dr. writes a script.
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Make sure the bottom of the shoe is really slip resistant. I would place in on the floor of the store to ensure it won't slide easily.
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I was going to suggest Mary Janes as well, because my MIL had the same problem. The shoes we bought her recently help her walk so much better, that I wish we'd gotten them sooner. She has such a problem with frozen feet and dragging them that the heavier shoes with rubber soles were a hindrance.

The shoes we bought were "aertex" brand, Blackberry Helen Stretch Mary Jane style. We bought them from a specialty shoe store called Treat your Feet, don't know if it's a chain or not. They were about 150.00 USD, but are definitely worth it. They are light enough weight that she can pick up her feet better, stretchy to accommodate the variations of edema, the strap helps hold them on her feet and it's Velcro fastened.
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If the shoes are too tight one day and falling off the next… does she have oedema in her feet and lower legs? It might be worth seeing if that can be better controlled, if it's the case.

You can get shoes will flexible grippy soles and a velcro strap across the top to keep them on, in a kind of "Mary Jane" style. So not trainers, but still light and fun to wear as well as supportive.

And I agree about home shopping catalogues' being the work of Satan. I'm clearing out my mother's room ready for her return home from and have bagged up twenty two pairs of unworn shoes with 'stretchers' in them that she must have been hoping would one day fit her. Not a chance… But the Salvation Army will be pleased!
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Believe it or not Kmart has some 'senior' friendly type shoes that may work for your mother and are inexpensive (you can return them easily if you need to). I've been going through a similar situation with my mother. She likes the plain sandal type with Velcro (her feet are also wide so this helps... Kmart has shoes for wide feet also... or you can even look at some of the men's sandals that may work for her)... Keep checking back with them for inventory... They get their sandals before spring. Or, you can order online kmart/cobbie-cuddlers-women-s-sandal-beatrice-white/p-035VA69093212P?prdNo=7&blockNo=7&blockType=G7 Hope this may help.
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If she's wasting money on the shoes, I might figure a way to stop the shoe magazines from coming. Some people get addicted to mail order regardless of whether they need the item or not.

I don't have any experience with Parkinson's disease, but I bet there are those who do who will reply to your question.

Does your mom have fluid retention in her feet that might fluctuate from day to day? That could cause her shoes to be too tight one day and loose the next.

What I did with my cousin, who is now in a wheelchair, but gets up and down a little, is to have her stand on a piece of paper. I then drew an outline of her foot and cut it out. I also measured the depth of her foot. I took this and a tape measure with me when I went to shoe shop.

I put the outline of her foot on the bottom of the shoe and measured the depth on the inside of the shoe. It worked pretty well, but my cousin still prefers her old standbys of lace-up, Reebok hightops. They can be tightened or loosened up if her feet are swollen and they have good grip on the sole. They also support her ankles really well.

Good luck with your shoe search.
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