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are there programs that would help her financially? not just add to our burdens? would she need to get any certifications or could she just bill someone weekly? who would we contact?

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Sandy, have your daughter read this... here are some things to think about if one is trying to decide whether to quit work to care for an aging parent.... on average if a working person quits work he/she will lose over the years between $285,000 and $325,000 which includes not only loss of salary over those years... it also includes the net worth loss of the health insurance coverage.... loss of money being put into Social Security/Medicare..... loss of other benefits such as matching 401(k).... profit sharing.... workman's comp insurance.... company sponsored life insurance.... vacation pay, sick pay.... tuition assistance, etc. [source: in part Reuters 5/30/12]

I agree with Babalou above, about hiring professionals from an Agency to come in to help, as this isn't their first rodeo, they know what to do. Plus coming from an Agency that is licensed, bonded, they also have workman's comp for their employees in care the employee becomes injured [back injuries are common due to the nature of the work]. Plus if a Caregiver calls out sick, another one is scheduled to take his/her place.

There's a lot to think about.
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The simplest thing is to pay agency caregivers to do this. They are trained.
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I am with Windyridge, I have know several women who quit their jobs to care for elderly parents, husband, and in one case ex-husband. Who, after several years of caretaking, found they couldn't get jobs because their skills were outdated. It is extremely important for people who are thinking about quitting a job to care for a loved one to have a plan in place for their own old age. Also, fair or not, in many cases, the older you are when job hunting the less chance you have of getting a job, especially if you are not presently working.
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It always concerns me when people talk of quitting their jobs to become caregivers. Don't rush into this. Lots of folks have regretted the move.
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Two programs:
Medicaid, if you have less than $2K in the bank.
VA Aid & Attendance if he is a wartime veteran.
Otherwise you pay out of pocket, with a written care contract specifying wages, benefits and time off. Let's say you pay her $10/hr, for 4 hours a day, 7 days a week. That would be $280 a week. Is that what she makes now?
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Click on the "caregiver forum" above and read through the topics particularly "money and legal" and educate yourself and your daughter on the reality of quitting a job to become a full-time caregiver.
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