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My dad had a bout with cellulitis a few months back. He is diabetic. The redness went away pretty quick but it took the open wound months to heal, which it finally has. He had developed edema in the leg and a couple doses of Lasix helped and then it finally went down. He had wound care in place to change the dressings during all of this and then the last couple weeks he was bandaged from his ankle up to his knee. Now his leg looks great (the doctor agrees!) and he purchased diabetic knee socks to wear. I am being told by the wound specialist that he should have DAILY compression therapy. I'm not sure what this is exactly. I should know more this week. She says it will help keep the edema from happening again. Daily? Seems excessive. With my dad's schedule of other appointments and other caregivers coming in, I'm not sure how he would squeeze this in every single day. He is not going to want this nor do I. What do I do? Should I get his PCP involved? I'm sure she didn't prescribe this.

I have worn them,they actually feel pretty good. Another therapy might be a pump with stockings of air that wrap around the calf only. It alternately pumps air to help with circulation.
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Reply to gladimhere
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I have heard of daily compression therapy and it is different from compression stockings. The are specially fitted wraps with Velcro - 2 sets - one for daytime and one for sleeping.
They are prescribed by a lymphedema or woundcare center. The regular TEDS hose usually can’t be used daily on these patients as often as you’ve seen when a person’s legs are swollen they ooze clear sometimes serous (yellow colored) fluid & applying the compression hose causes the skin to come off which then is a potential source of infection especially with diabetes and pts with CHF.
The compression hose “wraps” are prescribed after medical staff do measurements and determine how many mmHg the patient needs applied to prevent the edema from getting worse or oozing.
Taking care of lower extremity edema in your dad’s situation will need constant vigilance on the CG’s part.
Please explain to your dad that he needs to limit his salt intake to almost nothing. Explain that salt is not his friend anymore as it contributes greatly to the amount of swelling in his legs. Also elevate them when sitting and walk frequently to help his veins push the blood up from his lower legs to his heart.
The wraps should be covered by Medicare as DME, the amt will be determined by his Medicare plan. His secondary should pick up most of the 20% not covered by traditional Medicare.
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Reply to Shane1124
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Sounds like compression socks worn through the day and removed before bed. They are hard to get on but they will help him.
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Reply to gladimhere
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Yes, I think that's possibly it. The socks the nurse told him to purchase were Jobst Sensifoot Diabetic Knee High Socks. He purchased a pair of white ones but we are waiting for the local store to get some other colors in (I could order online but he doesn't like using a credit card and I really don't want to put on mine). He has care that comes in 4 times a week and he doesn't change his socks every day so I believe they are helping him. He pulls them down to put vaseline on them every day. He showed me his process today. He is doing great with it and his leg is so much better. He said they are actually very comfortable.
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Reply to Babs75
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I think that they just mean compression socks everyday.

This is something you would be doing when he gets dressed. My dad had white to the knee compression socks that he only wore during the day then removed them for bed.

They are a bear to get on, so put them on like a nylon and it is much easier, can't pull them on as they are tight.

If what you learn is different will you please let me know. Thanks!
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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JoAnn29 Aug 25, 2018
Yes, roll them down to the toe and roll back up stretching a little as you go. My nephew has been wearing them because of water retention. Make sure Dads legs are elevated when he sits.
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