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They have increased his meds.

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Hello Everyone, My father has been diagnosed with depression too, and hates taking his meds. I feel for you. My dad never communicates, never has, it has been just talking about superficial things, like the weather or a tv show, but once we go into deep talk he changes the topic. His doctor said he has to take his meds, so we will go again to the pharmacy and get a new prescription, hopefully he takes it this time. I heard Vitamin B12 is the best. So I try to make a nice smoothie (with bananas, protein powder, cinnamon, honey, soy milk and blueberries) which he likes and remind him to take his vitamins. Try to get him on vitamins.
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Do they have a staff social worker or therapist or any sort who could talk with him? Would the supervising physician listen to concerns and consider trying a little medication?
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My father has suffered from depression since he was very young and has gone through severe depressions which would last for months. He would take meds but once he felt better would stop. Most recently he was in a bad depression but meds stopped working. He underwent ECT Treatment as a last resort and it worked. He is now on meds and realizes that he needs to stay on them. He's 86 yrs old.
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He is in rehab with my mother. So it is for a short duration. If it weren't for rehab, he wouldn't leave his room at all. I try to be there as much as possible. But his depression is taking a toll on me. I can't imagine being my mother. We are moving them in 2.weeks, but I am very concerned that he won't make it that long.
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Rehab does NOT consist of staring at walls!!! This may not be a good facility. There should be engaging activities and stimulation, and things to do after therapy sessions, and staff to encourage participation when you can't be there. Sorry if there is no other choice except to use this place. There should be a cheerful, busy atmosphere; frankly, I'd go for a low-rent, lesser-rep kind of place with a couple of "therapy" animals roaming around, rather than one that was overly manicured, quiet and sterile every time, though my mom was the opposite in preference and hated the one I picked out first after she came to Arkansas.
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He is in a skilled nursing facillity. That basically lets him stare at the walls. I try to get him outside when the weather is decent. But I live in Minnesota. We have had a lousy winter. I keep trying to tell him the facility is only temporarily. Which it is. He fractured his CT by a fall. So it is rehabilitation is he doing there. But he has stopped eating and is not communicating with us ab out.his feelings.
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How old is he?
Does he live with you?
Is he ambulatory or does he stay in bed?

Depression in the elderly is very common. My mom died from depression. Yes, it can happen. She had a tumor, she had it removed, she didn't need chemo or radiation or anything like that. She went to rehab for a few weeks and did very well. She got back home, took to her bed, never got up (except to use the bathroom), began falling every time she did get up, and died within a month.

I think if we had more information on your dad it would help people understand the whole picture. Did this depression come out of nowhere or was there a precipitating factor? Is your dad fighting the depression or giving in to it?
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meds, favorite foods (does he liek chocolate?) plus activities both mental and physical excercise, pets or animal assisted therapy, plants and gardening, getting out for fresh air and a little sunshine might help take the edge off it too.

depression is horrible and horribly underestimated! I hope something works!
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