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Besides personal aid, any medicine helpful? (besides depakote)

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There are several medications that can be used, but first I'd make sure he has a good evaluation to make sure nothing else is going on. The facility should have a behavioral care plan to help manage behaviors. You can contact the local or state long term care ombudsman and they can assist you in making sure your father has the care he deserves.
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My mom was agitated and violent for years. We finally got the right combination of meds and it has been a dramatic and positive change. Risperdal twice daily and Paxil was a miracle for us.
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He needs to be seen by a doctor.
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We're doing Ativan for my mother, but other changes helped too: the nursing staff adjusted her medication times so that she had a little more time in the morning to wake up before her AM meds, and we moved her to a private room so that it was quieter (less stimulation). It's not perfect, and she is still suffering from anxiety and aggressive impulses, but there has definitely been an improvement. Much of her combativeness occurs when she feels over-stimulated (particularly too much noise or too many people moving around her at one time). A good facility will find alternatives (often through trial and error), hopefully via a combination of chemical and environmental approaches. Good luck!
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I would suggest you speak with staff and find out why he is combative. Are they doing something to him? Is he frustrated about living there? When did this start? What does his doctor say about this behavior? Chemical restraints for someone with dementia can exacerbate the situation. You need to investigate what is going on and perhaps find other solutions (another facility).
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Mom (94) had to be moved 5 times and was also sent to two geri-psych hospitals to have her meds adjusted. She was finally put on Trazadone and Depakote, but was still very combative. Once again in a hospital - only this time her own hospital - she was treated for 10 days for a UTI and put on Risperdal which worked wonders. They kept her on Depakote too for depression/mood-stabilizing. By adding an "as-needed" dose of Risperdal at 2 pm, we proactively prevent the sundowning problems, and I feel like I have my dear, sweet, funny Mom back. Good luck finding the right answer for your family!!!
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We see a geriatric psychiatrist for my 90 year old mom. She's prescribed Ativan, Seroquel and Lexapro for mom. Mom used to be combative, aggressive, nasty and belligerent during the "sundowning hours" (usually from 3-bedtime). These prescriptions have helped unbelievably well and mom is more content, conversive and enjoyable to be around. Plus, we don't have to worry about how fast we can duck when objects used to start flying!

Another tip is to watch old musicals! Mom loves watching "White Christmas", "Sound of Music" and other Rogers & Hammerstein productions. She smiles and taps her fingers. It's a relief to see her finally enjoy something!
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Music helps. Get him an old fashion record player or cassette and his
Music ... Might be lonely. If he's a veteran , call vets administration for ideas and help.
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Check his meds first. I had to get help from
Neurologist and my mom is more cheerful. Trazadone helped. She's on 10 mg namenda and 50'mg Trazdone at night. No more aricept.
Maybe a urinary track infection .
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Have him seen by a geriatric psychiatrist.

There are many different classes of medications that can be tried. There are anti anxiety meds, antidepressants and antipsychotics, to name a few.
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