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Dad has LBD and Parkinsons. My mom is his caregiver. He hallucinates and thinks she is someone hitting and stealing from him. Fearing he will hit back (imagining she hit him then he hits for real in defense)... what do I do? He is physically healthy and I am thinking a SNF will not accept him due to this. Any advice?

Not APS....The Area Agency of Aging. Sorry.
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Reply to Pepsee
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What?! That's ridiculous! If a drunk is a threat to someone's person, they take them in. If a man is walking down the street delusional, threatening ppl they take him in. But they won't event take him to the hospital?? Something's wrong there. 

 Is your Mom up for placing him in a facility? Please get the Dr involved. And if he becomes aggressive towards Mom, call the paramedics. You can try APS for your Mom.

 I'm so sorry you guys are going through this and it seems there's no help when it hits the fan. Let us Know what happens. Stay close.💛
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Reply to Pepsee
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Problem is that he thinks my mom, caregiver, is the bad person hurting him. Nuplazid made him worse. I have called the police on him before... twice and they said he would only ne taken to the hospital if he was considered a 5150... this illness isnt 5150 so they say it is a medical condition... they refused to take him in
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Reply to Lookin4hlp
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I'm not sure about a SNF not accepting him, but they would probably medicate him. I think it would be worth trying that with him at home, especially if Mom wants to keep him home.

Hallucinations are common in LBD. Often they are benign -- seeing little children playing in the yard. Delusions are very common in many kinds of dementia. Believing that the neighbors are spying on you, for example.

In LBD a sleep disorder called RBD is common. It involves scary dreams and making defensive moves while sleeping. Once my husband hit me in the chest while dreaming. We both woke up. What was going on?! He explained that he was trying to defend me from the bad guys. I told him as long as it was a just a dream he should let the bad guys have me!

RBD can be easily treated with a med.

There is a new drug on the market (which I have no experience with) that may be helpful for delusions and hallucinations in Parkinson's. It is Nuplazid.

I guess my recommendation is to start with his physicians, especially any specialists for the Parkinson's or LBD. Try to reduce/eliminate the paranoid delusions. This would be helpful for your mom or for any future long-term-care facilities. You may not have success, but it certainly is worth trying, in my opinion.
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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The Alzheimer's Association also helps LBD caregivers like your Mom and me. Call their help line 1-800-272-3900
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Reply to jjariz
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Looking4hlp,
I'm hoping others with experience dealing w/meds and hallucinations will pop up and help. But in the meantime you can search that subject in other posts. Then can see what suggestions were given then.
Just hit those three horizontal lines in the far left top corner.

In the search box just put something like , LBD meds for hallucinations, see what pops up. Good luck.
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Reply to Pepsee
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My Ex is in nursing home with LBD, but he is very docile and has grown to like it there....after years of saying he didn't want to end up that way! Our daughter goes to see him almost every day, but our son rarely visits him--yet he seems to not recognize her but knew our son. Wish my son would do more to help his sister out, but he says he has a day job (she is an RN who works nights) and a family to take care of whereas she has only dogs and cats!
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Reply to Arleeda
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LTC is Long Term Care.

PCP primary care physician.

A friend’s Dad was diagnosed with LBD last winter. He was combative, the police had to come with the ambulance, but it was a neighbour who managed to ‘talk him down’ and get him into the ambulance.

He was in hospital for about a month while they waited for a bed to open up for him in a Long term care facility. It simply was not safe for his wife or him to be home.

It came on very quickly. At times he is lucid and with it. Other times he is 30 years in the past. Or aggressive and scary.
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Reply to Tothill
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Nevermind. long term care, primary care physician:) took some googling
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Reply to Lookin4hlp
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Also he takes seroquel, Xanax and Lexapro. I read that increased dopamine causes hallucinations... xanax flood the brain with dopamine... seriquel tries to lower dopamine. Why would a dr give both opposing medications! Aricept didnt work for him... which hallucination meds have worked for some of you?
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Reply to Lookin4hlp
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What is LTC and PCP? He hasnt touched her yet... i just fear it.
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Reply to Lookin4hlp
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There are meds for hallucinations. If your Dad shows violent tendancies, its time for LTC. This is not fair to Mom to live in fear.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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This is a very hard situatiom. My mom is on a medicine for delusions. I would call dr. Ask what can be done. Im so sorry.
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Reply to Jeanie50
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Oh no your poor Mom! Please call his PCP and tell him about this behavior.

How long has he been like this? Is it a new behavior? Has he been tested for a UTI?

Either way, I believe your Mom is in danger. Especially since you say he's physically fine. So he must have strength yet. I would not leave Mom alone with him.

Ask PCP for an evaluation for a memory care facility asap. This is a serious situation. But in the mean time don't hesitate to call 911 or take him to ER. He is a danger to others.

Please come back and let us know how it goes. Others here will likely have better suggestions. Hang in there and protect Mom.
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Reply to Pepsee
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