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My father is 84 had congestive heart failure,dementia and high calcium and has been told he should have surgery to remove parathyroid gland(s) but has refused.

The issue is he has been feeling bad and wanted meds for arthritis but when he called dr he just asked for pain meds. The doctor called him in metoprolol succ 25 mg. and he took one. I've read this is for blood pressure issues and those recovering from heart attack. He has not had a heart attack but he does suffer from hypertension and already takes meds for that. I worried this med my cause harm...also I read a person should not immediately stop taking this med orbit could cause severe problems. Well he's not going to take it again but that's causing me worry too. Any thoughts?

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Freighter, that is sometimes the problem. My dad spoiled my mom, and I took up where he left off. It is difficult not to! As I told you, my health, finances, and marriage suffered because of my decisions. Don't allow that to happen to you. Visit with them, but make some topics off limits. Spoil them if and when YOU want to, not when their demands cause your life to suffer. You are a great daughter. I know you love you parents; and, no matter what they might say, they do, too. :)
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ProfeChari, thank you.... I wished I had known about this website 6 years ago... I wouldn't have spoiled my parents at the beginning :P
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Dearest freqflier, I have read some of your previous posts and realize that you place is more than full. When I was caring for my mom, she was the focus of my life and my only major responsibility. Fortunately, although she didn't like it, she listened to her doctor and to me about selling her home and land and moving to an ALF. She was in her mid 70s at the time. I have always kept good records and knew how to obtain medical help if I needed it, so that was routine. She passed away over three years ago. It wasn't until this year that my husband's health problems began. So, I already knew about and had the ability to keep records concerning him. He is rather stubborn, although not to the extreme your parents are! So, I completely agree that trying to be involved with their meds, records, etc, as well as with your sig other's and yours, is asking too much! I have mentioned in responses to other questions, that my extreme involvement in my mom's care almost caused me to lose my husband and it did put a strain on our relationship for at least a year after her death. I regret being overly involved and protective of my mom when I knew she was in a good facility and a pleasant, safe environment. So, with your parents' attitude, I think you are right to focus on the care, record keeping, and other facets of your and you sig other's lives. I think I have read enough of your posts to say that I am sure you will respond to your parents' needs when they ask you to do so. You can't help people who are mentally able to make their decisions, and do not want your "interference" in their lives,

My previous response to the issue of mail order pharmacies was addressed to anyone who may be caring for someone on that type of having their filling prescriptions filled. They save one out of three month's charges for medications, are convenient for people who don't drive or have transportation, and offer the services of a pharmacist.

I am not sure of your age, freqflier; but, I wish I had had your insight and perception when I began my life as a care taker!
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freflyer you are doing the only thing you can do. This is one of the problem I see with Seniors taking care of Seniors. Take care of yourself first. hugs
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ProfeChari, couple years ago I starting carrying a typed list of what pills I am taking as I can't pronounce half of them :P My sig other has his list in his wallet.

As for my parents, I have no idea what pills they are taking... I have too much on my own medical plate to have to try to remember what they are doing. Plus I feel since my parents had decided they are able to live alone independently in their large single family house at the age of 90+, then they can take care of their own meds. Honestly, I am too tired to deal with that aspect, I let their geriatric doctor handle it. Once my parents decide to move into assistant living, then I will have more time to focus on that aspect.
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If meds are filled through a mail order company, in my case endorsed by my BlueMedicare insurance, there is access to a pharmacist there. I recently ran out of a medication and decided to wait for the refill in the mail. When I began having some scary reactions, I called to ask the company to trace my med for me. The person who did that asked how many days I had not been taking my med. She immediately transferred me to a pharmacist who began asking questions about my symptoms. It was early on a weekday, and he told me to contact my doctor immediately, describe the situation, and request a few days of the med through a local pharmacy. He said he would fax the doctor on my behalf, as well. He stressed the dangers of stopping this med cold turkey. Before I had time to contact my doctor, I had a call from my doctor's nurse, asking about my condition and telling me that several days of my med was being filled by the local pharmacy I had on my records. Problem solved, initiated by the online pharmacist. I have received letters from my insurance company, stressing the dangers of drug interactions and offering to evaluate my meds to make sure I am not taking anything that might interfere with something else. The few pennies you mentioned equals a month's worth of med. You can order three month's worth of meds and pay for two. That can make a substantial difference in a senior's budget and/or ability to have transportation to and from a local pharmacy. Get the number of your loved one's mail-in pharmacy and ask about their services. I am sure a local pharmacist, would be glad to evaluate your combination of meds, also. As someone has already said, in the real world and especially when receiving meds from more than one doctor, the doctors can inadvertently prescribe a med without looking at other meds the patient is taking. Also, it helps to make a list of the patient's meds, complete with dosage, time of day taken, and reason for taking it. Keep it up- to- date and take it with the patient to every doctor's appointment. I learned that while caring for my mother and am now using it for my husband and myself. So, make multiple copies, one to put in the patient's wallet and several others for doctors' appointments! Of course, if in any doubt about anything at any time, contact the patient's doctor. I hope this helps.
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Veronica91, you are so right about using the same pharmacy each time.

I wished my parents would do that but instead they use a mail order pharmacy because it is cheaper. Yet my Mom has issues with fillers in the pills, and I told her she needs to use a local pharmacy so that she can request a certain pharmacy manufacturer where the side effects are more user friendly.... but my Mom rather be sick from the fillers so she and Dad can save a few cents on each pill :P
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Have all your prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy so the pharmacist is aware of all drugs you are taking. they are suposed to talk with the patient about the uses, dangers, side effects and interaction of any new medication
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I agree with previous advice. Sometimes the pamphlet that accompanies a med will say, in spite of side effects, your doctor has chosen it for a specific purpose...and the benefits outweigh the possible side effects. Another thing is for you or your dad to be more specific than to just ask for "pain" medication. Keep the doctor informed, and ask if you are unsure about something. He is fortunate to have such a caring daughter. I hope some of the responses have put you on the right track to find the answers you are seeking.
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What is that, a beta blocker?

Rule of thumb: if your dad's doctor has prescribed a medicine, give it to him as prescribed. If you observe worrying side effects, stop giving it to him AND call his doctor urgently for advice. If you're just anxious about it but haven't noticed any problems, don't stop giving it to him but do call his doctor for advice. And in the ideal world, accompany your father to all significant appointments and ask questions at the time (I realise it's a little late for that in this case!).

The trouble with patients of our parents' age is that very often they have complex co-morbidities, and with multiple problems go multiple prescriptions, and with multiple prescriptions go problematic drug interactions. Now while it is true that Dr Perfect will carefully review a patient's drug chart before prescribing anything, in the real world Dr Normal is likely to be pushed for time. It is therefore up to you as the patient's advocate to HELP the doctor - as opposed to argue with and challenge - by taking a lively interest in what is being prescribed and highlight any issues that come to your attention. E.g. my mother has severely impaired renal function. She also got gout. The gout medication's patient information leaflet said the medication was contraindicated by impaired renal function. To give or not to give? That is the question. So I called the doctor, the doctor explained that while we'd rather avoid it, treating the gout takes priority: go to it. So we did, and happily the attack was short-lived and no lasting harm done.

What a good many people do, sadly, is go their doctor for advice, get given a prescription, and then second-guess the doctor without having the courtesy to inform the doctor that they're going to ignore his advice. Well, we're all consenting adults (not to mention paying customers, in the US) and free to do so. But don't then blame the doctor for getting it wrong because that is Not Fair.

In any case, Tanya, none of this addresses your father's arthritic pain. Do not be tempted by over the counter remedies: if your father hasn't yet been prescribed pain relief, that's something else you might want to call up about.
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Metoprolol cold also help with symptoms of an overactive thyroid, but no interaction with parathyroid that I know of. No harm done unless it dropped his blood pressure too low.
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I am on metoprolol for hypertension, and I have zero side effects [knock on wood]. My Cardiologist said it is not uncommon for people who don't have a blood pressure problem to take just one pill just prior to having to speak in public.... it can calm their nerves.

You're best bet is to contact your Dad's primary doctor or his Cardiologist.
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Call the doctor and discuss why he prescribed this medication.
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