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After having liquid ensure/protein shake/tea he goes on calling all members names which is non stop n when v go to his room to attend he says that he did not cal or just cover me with comforter or what time it is excetra.He has Blood pressure n Thyroid.Otherwise he is okay.Please advice us what should we do regarding is non stop calling.I will appreciate your advice.

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all input on this topic is necessary. now problems mentioned should be checked!
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LLamalover - I am not incorrect. Hypothyroidism will cause weight loss in those who have no appetite and are taking synthroid. Most people who get diagnosed with hypothyroidism have usually gained weight where the thyroid is producing too much TSH. When one has a HIGH TSH count, they have hypothyroidism, a LOW TSH count, produces a hyperthyroidism condition. It is confusing, but I did not miss this question on my final nursing test.
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My dad..the same. Have his teeth, mouth and throat checked for thrush, sores or dental problems. My dad had a difficult time swallowing and it was painful to eat. Once his other problems were corrected he regained his appetite and is eating well again (thank God).
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ferris1: You are incorrect. This man has HYPERthyroidism, which causes weight loss
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Tailor: How are you claiming that this man, your father is okay? He is definitely not "okay." Take him to his doctor!
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Be careful after drinking liquids for so long that when he DOES eat he might not be able to swallow and aspirate. If his muscles have started atrophying then food will choke him and it will go into his lungs. My FIL had feeding tube due to not being able to swallow food not even ensure.
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All great advice. As my FIL was actively dying from Leukemia. the main symptom was rapid weight loss. He simply could not eat enough calories to fight the disease and maintain a "healthy" weight.
Daddy also lost a LOT of weight at the end of his life. He simply could not swallow anything. He had a living will (something you should know about your dad) and it specifically stated that he did not want any outside measures to keep him alive, ie: feeding tubes, IV's etc. Of course that was hard, but it's what he chose. If your father has not made clear his wishes, you have to make them for him. For sure take him to an ER for an assessment. And good luck--I know this post sounds like I am saying he's dying and that wasn't my intent. Just, you need to be prepared to hear some things from drs that you may not like. 90 is a ripe old age....and he doesn't sound as if he's really enjoying life much.
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Significant. Please excuse typo.
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Signufucant unintentional weight loss and only drinking liquids with no nutrition are serious medical signs and should not be taken lightly. Whether he's at 84 pounds or has lost 84 lbs, he needs to see a doctor. It is beyond home remedy/home diagnosis. Besides doing the right thing for your Dad, unless he has been evaluated, diagnosed, and advised on care for his malnutrition or "failure to thrive" you could find yourself in a heap of mess too when he passes. Clearly you're coming here for help, but then seem concerned about his nonstop calling. Take him to the doctor or ER. When people in the ER have no means of nutrition they are admitted right away in my experience. Even if he's deemed inappropriate for a feeding tube or has an advance directive against one, you need to have him evaluated. It could be end of life, wasting syndrome, a mass in his throat preventing him from eating but unable to feel it, or a range of other things, but please get him medical attention immediately.
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also, wen one stops eating isn't that part of the dying process?
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are the food supplement drinks high in sugar??? my dad has diabetes.
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I too had difficulty reading/understanding your post. This isn't a criticism; you may have difficulty typing (tough to do on cell phones or some other keyboards!) But if you can try again with more information you will probably get better information and advice from those of us that respond. Is Dad in bed all the time? Is he living at home alone or with a caregiver, or is he currently in a nursing home? Is chewing or swallowing solids a problem for him? Does he have good teeth or well fitting dentures? Over what period of time has he lost the weight and -- most important of all -- it is not absolutely clear if your father has LOST 84 pounds or if that is what he now weighs. If he's lost 84 pounds it also matters quite a lot whether he weighed 300 pounds to begin with or 200 pounds to begin with! Very low weight (taking into account the person's height and frame) is certainly a matter of grave concern and could be a medical emergency. Please...if his current weight is very low, this must be assessed by a doctor immediately. If he's at home or living with one of you, call an ambulance to take him to Emergency if necessary, or call adult protective services. A word about the feeding tube someone else mentioned. A feeding tube is really an extraordinary measure and one that many people (including my Mom, a retired nurse who now is in the later stages of ALZ) absolutely do not want. If your father does not have a "Living Will" or comparable legal statement giving instructions about whether he wants extreme measures taken towards the end of life, and he is no longer capable of making decisions or communicating what he wants, you and any other children will need the advice of physicians to help you make a decision about a whether to have a feeding tube or other extraordinary care. I think hospice could be very helpful in this situation as well. Assuming your Dad's weight loss is not life threatening, he can be properly nourished on liquids -- but they have to be the right ones! LOTS of protein and sufficient total daily calories for healthy nutrition. (FYI "Boost" comes in different formulas, including a high calorie/high protein style much more nutritious than the "original"). At age 90 I wouldn't be too worried about cavities! But there might well be other reasons to manage his sugar intake, so this is still something that needs a doctor's attention. On the other hand, aging and certainly dementia causes changes in our taste buds and I've been told the taste for "sweet" is the last one to be lost. Our theory with Mom -- and one promoted by the Director of Nursing -- is to get as many calories in her as possible and if sweet is what she wants, she gets a nutritious sweet like a milk pudding or ice cream (sweet tea or candy doesn't count!). I'm sure his non-stop calling can be very draining for all of you and if he is 90 I'd guess his children are not exactly young themselves which means you all may have your own issues and declining energy. Many caregivers are in that situation. So, bless you for worrying about your Dad and for seeking advice to help him. The best advice here is to have a doctor evaluate his weight, nutritional needs and calorie intake! If he's already in a nursing home or long term care facility, ask these questions of the medical director! If there is a Dietitian on staff talk to her about whether they can puree other foods or take other measures to help him get the best possible nutrition. If he's at home you can make "smoothies" in a blender with Boost (or Ensure) plus high protein Greek-style yogurt (plain no fat is fine unless he needs more fat calories) plus whatever his favorite fruits are. I typically use a banana (can freeze banana cut in chunks) or other frozen fruit in place of ice cubes which just dilute the drink. You can add orange juice or honey according to his taste. While I mean this advice sincerely, it is the advice of an amateur -- please insist that you are getting the maximum amount of advice and attention from professionals from whom you need help to give your Dad the best care. Good luck and God bless!
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In case your dad is going through part of the dying process, You may want to know that this may be among multiple reasons why he's not eating well. You may want to check out this page:

http://www.caringinfo.org/files/public/brochures/UnderstandingtheDyingProces.pdf
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Your choppy statements make my answer difficult, but I think you are saying your father has blood pressure and thyroid issues. These are not small issues. The thyroid controls metabolism (body temperature and regulates appetite). He must be on thyroid medication for life if this is a hypothyroidism challenge. If his blood pressure is too high, this will affect blood flow throughout his body and need to be kept under 120/80 (new guidelines, but can be higher for people over 70 yrs.). You do not say if he has dementia, but if he is only drinking his food he will lose weight. Other organs will start to break down without adequate solid food intake as well as his teeth getting cavities from all that sugar. Get him to a doctor to adequately diagnose all his issues.
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Assuming that your dad is living with you and your family, what you can do is go to speak with his doctor and explain what's going on. There may be some treatment or medication to be able to help with any psychological problems he may be having. As for his diet, you may want to seriously consider either putting him on ensure or maybe even a feeding tube since he's not getting the nutrition really needs to sustain him. It may also be that you might need the help of professionals to help you with your dad, or it may even boil down to the point of having to put him in a nursing home. Nursing homes have good workers who are able to get people to eat. My surrogate dad was actually skin and bones because he wouldn't eat a proper diet despite me often telling him that he really needs to eat better foods than he's eating. At the time, I had no help, and I actually figured one day walking in to find him. I'm just glad that the adult protective services stepped in when they did, Because at some point when dad was hospitalized, it was proximally realized just how bad of shape he was really in. Sometimes we may not know what kind of shape our aging parents are really in until they're hospitalized. What you may want to do is to get your dad in to see a doctor and have him seriously evaluated. If you can't get him into a doctors office anytime soon and you feel that he's in a very dangerous situation, you can always have him taken to the ER. If you can't get him into see his doctor anytime soon, explain that to the ER doctor and other staff who are gathering information. Depending on your dad's height and bone frame size, he may already be in very grave danger. Whatever his height is, you want to find out with a BMI chart what he should weigh for his height. If he happens to be underweight, then there's a problem for sure. If the BMI chart shows that he seriously overweight, then he needs immediate emergency help that a professional can give.
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He may need to be comforted or doesn't have concept of time or memory of calling you. Having comforting music in the room or a diffuser with calming smell (if not contraindicated by a medical condition or facility (is he at your home or in a facility?). Some seniors like a stuffed animal (hypoallergenic) nearby or comforting pictures. Make sure someone is going in the room often enough and not just waiting until he needs a shake. Is there a moment where someone simply sits with him even if quiet?
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My dad calls non stop, too. Don't answer. Let it go to voice mail and listen to your messages later. If it is a true emergency, the facility or caregiver will reach you. This isn't easy, I know. Just try it. Today one of dad's voicemail messages was so
sweet it made me cry. I promised myself I would take one day to myself and I did it!
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