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Even if he changes beneficiary, Medicaid will still count the policies as his asset. They look at who owns the policies. If the new beneficiary is a nursing home, that may be part of an admission agreement.
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You ask a tough question, the answer to which I suspect could/would cause upset to the former beneficiary.

I think the answer turns on the extent of the dementia at the time, whether your father had capacity in certain areas such as changing a beneficiary on his life insurance and knowing that he's done so. I'm not even sure if a doctor could make that determination just by meeting with your father for a period of time equivalent to an office visit. (I'm assuming that the dementia isn't consistent and constant but fluctuates.)

If you're the former beneficiary, I can understand your concern.

Perhaps others will respond, but frankly, I'm not really sure at this time that it could be said with certainty that your father was or was not of capacity at the time to make that decision.

This is unfortunately one of those grey areas - he could have been perfectly lucid at the time, or under the influence of someone, or just not as lucid as he normally would be.

I don't know what the answer is.
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Beneficiary change in normal and term life insurance; taking the benefit away from him.
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What kind of insurance are you referring to, and what is his signature for?
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