My Dad has no funds but needs to move closer to me, immediately. Any suggestions?

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My Dad was recently declared fully disabled, he has had depression for years and needs to move closer to me. He is unable to complete any of his paperwork and no longer has enough money to pay his bills and eat. I am relatively stable financially but at 26 and a single mom, I did not plan to care for my Dad for many years to come. I do not know where to start or who to turn to. There is no family he can move in with near him and get out of his depression. He cries most afternoons when we talk and last Thanksgiving attempted suicide and was in rehab for 2 weeks. I would like to move him as quickly as possible, and may have space for him in the interim but without his disability or Medicare I don't foresee him moving out anytime soon.

Ahh! Someone please give me a direction.

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Daughter: That is good he was a CG.He should tell this to the psychiatrist as this may be a crucial link to his depression.
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Daughter, he can apply the underlying principles of helping and caring for people in a manner different than that of direct medical care. The medical principles of data gathering, analysis, assessment, diagnosis, and solution development apply to many areas that he can still use to share his skills.

The same principles apply to animal care; he could become involved in rescue groups, or in something like Big Brothers, sharing his own experiences and battles to help guide others in dealing with their own issues.
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I have been lucky in the fact that my Dad was a professional, medical caregiver for my entire life. I have seen him care for many people up through their passing and helping the family they left behind. That is part of his depression, is that he no longer knows how to help people now that he is physically disabled. I hope to help him find that once we get the paperwork figured out.
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You know, many of us who had to be CG's were not in the medical profession. This is even harder work because what if you make mistake in the caregiving?
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Someone mentioned a very good point earlier. APS..Adult Protective Services should get involved and can help if due to your fathers mental illness, he is no longer able to care for himself..its called Self Neglect. He can't buy food, he is neglecting his personal hygiene, he can't maintain a safe and healthy enviornment, etc.. If this is the reality of his situalion, APS must step in and get him into a safe place. He is a vunerable adult by virtue of his mental illness, not his age.
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Dear Hisdaughter,
I own an assisted living home in Alaska. It sounds like you are aware of the fact that you really aren't able to "take care" of your father. Its clear that you feel that you are the only one who can help him. The reality is that you can't take on the full burden of his care yourself...you are a young parent and on active duty. So, you are thinking above your emotions...this is very good. Here is the point..your father DOES have financial resourced that he can tap into. He is fortunate that he owns a home that has equity in it and he does have a retirement plan Its true, no one likes to have to use these assets too early in life. But right now, your father needs to use his money. The State (all States), will not be able to assist him with anything as long as he has assets.
Secondly, the best way to catch the attention of the persons and agencies that can take over his care for you, is at the height of a crisis. In other words, if you father feels suicidal, he should go to an emergency room to be evaluated and hopefully be admitted to a psyiatric instution for stabilation. Then he becomes the responsibility of the social workers. Hopefully, they will determine that he can no longer live alone. He needs to be placed in an assisted living home. There is usually State funding programs that will kick in immediately to pay the ALH until he can liquidate his assets. He needs a conservator to manage these matters and control his finances. He should consider asking the court to get him a state guardian. If he can get a state guardian, then you won't have the responsibility for his wellbeing, housing, food, safety...the guardian will be responsible. This may all sound extreme but it is an effective way of getting your dad the support he needs.
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Been: Wow! You suffered from 2 life threatening diseases-depression and alcoholism! I agree. This man needs to get seen by a psychiatrist STAT! My own husband suffers from inherited clinical depression. None of the disease is pretty!
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This is going to be a little long but at 57 I was in EXACTLY in the same place your Dad is in so I hope you will take the time to read it.
I am 61 and a recovering alcoholic with 18 continuous years of sobriety. Though my depression began years ago and I was on medication, between January and Sept of 2011 I was so distressed I had called the Employees Assistance Program twice for a referral to a counselor. The 2nd time they referred me to a counselor that was certified in addiction/alcoholism. He recognized that the medication I was taking was no longer working, and, with some changes, I did get better.
But it didn’t last. I just got deeper and deeper. In Sept 2011 I lost my job and my insurance so was unable to continue my visits to the therapist. And I was trying to stretch my medication and wasn’t taking it as prescribed. Just after I lost my job, my dog of 13 years died and then 4 short months later my Mom passed. I had a complete come apart and was contemplating suicide. Finally, thanks to the love of some good friends, I wrote a 2-page typed letter and faxed it to both my therapist and my Internist. Because I couldn’t concentrate or think, didn’t want to shower or dress or do anything else to take care of myself, it took me two weeks to put that letter together. I held nothing back. Both my therapist and my doctor told me to file for disability.
It took me a while to get it done but thanks to their support, I was approved for benefits the very first time I applied, which is completely unheard of. I had to meet with their psychiatrist and the process took 7 months from submission to approval. I have a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder. So, having experienced this whole process, here are my suggestions.
1. Decide in which city your Dad will reside and begin the process in that city. It will be easier. I worked with the local SS/Disability office.
2. Get him to a therapist ASAP. Get him diagnosed, on medication, whatever they deem he needs.
3. File for disability IMMEDIATELY. If he is approved, they will pay him retroactive to the date he first filed no matter how long it takes to get approved. Be sure to keep copies of everything!
4. Once you file, go ahead and line up an attorney. I had all my paperwork signed and complete so that if I received notification that I was denied I could pick up the phone and the attorney could immediately respond and do their thing. I think all the Disability attorneys work on contingency. Here in Alabama, there is a cap as to the amount they can receive for their services. Fortunately, I didn’t have to utilize their services and still took me 5 months to get approved.
5. A person on Disability does not become eligible for Medicare for 18 months after submission. In my case, it was determined I was completely disabled after my Mom died even though it was three months later before I applied.
6. Be 100% straightforward on the Disability application. No need to be concerned about being embarrassed. Just tell it like it is!
I shared my personal information so you can see just how deep your Dad is in that tornado of dark feelings. However he got there, it is hell on earth and a horrible place to be. He does need some help. I will pray for you both. God bless!
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Daughter: He needs to get to a psychiatrist, who can give him an RX for depression meds STAT! Also, is he on a suicide warch, as he's already attempted it once?
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Wow, at such a relatively young age, may I ask how he got himself in such a predicament? Didn't he have a job and a pension? And can he file for Section 8 housing?
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