If my brother were to have partial ownership in the house could my Dad give the house away to a new wife?

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One big problem in our lives is that my friend's recently widowed Dad is approaching dementia, and even without dementia is quite susceptible to any lady companionship and being taken to the cleaners by unscrupulous types. His mother had wanted the house to go to my friend so that he would stay and care for a disabled sibling who can't be named heir or she'd lose any state medical benefits she needs to live. question is, is being on the title enough to prevent that from happening, or does he have to actually take over ownership of the house. Legally he could be named as the partial or sole owner of the house, he has equity that has not been formally documented, and he is afraid he will lose all he has invested (sweat, improvements, caregiving) if his dad remarries. Complicated question, Not sure I've even given enough information for an answer. Let me know what you think.

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swindled ass. if a female partner does dad right till the end i think she should be compensated in a division of property. caregiving for someone in their final months or years is worth some serious consideration in comparison to kids who might have hit and missed during dads lifetime.
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pstiegman - the son is the daughter's guardian, jointly with the Dad, and it is not yet time for the Dad to have a guardian. I love the idea of the house in the son's name with father and disabled daughter as tenants. How could we explain why we want to do that to the father.... "Hey dad, we are afraid you are going to get swindled?" That's a tough conversation to have. It's possible though. Thanks.
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Elder Care lawyer with EXPERIENCE! Too much is at stake here to hope or guess.
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It sounds like the father and a daughter both need a guardian. Your friend should see an attorney, with dad if he is willing to discuss setting up a trust. The house could be put in the son's name listing both the father and disabled daughter as life tenants. If dad goes into a nursing home tomorrow, there will be a lien on the property, but the state will not evict the disabled daughter.
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On one of his good days, you should take him to see an elder law attorney.
Having another person's name on the deed SHOULD protect the house from being sold or transferred without notifying that person, but I can speak from experience that it doesn't always. My name was on the deed to my father's house, but he sold it without my involvement. Still don't know how it made it's way through settlement. It was during the de-regulated, housing bubble years, so probably just an inattentive title agent.
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p.s. His dementia is sporadic. At times all is clear in his thinking (other than lack of long term memories). Other times he can't place himself in the day. Will wonder what he did yesterday etc. When he's clear, you could easily mistake him for an Executive on his day off. Makes me wonder what would happen if things ever got 'difficult' and anyone tried to prove his competancy, it might depend on when the interviewer caught him on a good or a bad day..
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Come to that, if the father is suffering from dementia how can he consent to a future marriage?

I agree that it would be best to get the whole situation reviewed by an experienced attorney, with a particular focus on ensuring that the disabled dependent child of the first marriage is protected.
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Why worry about your friend's dad getting a new wife when he has dementia? Yes, men with dementia are susceptible to the charms of a woman, but he would have to be in that position first (where is he going to meet such a woman?), and if he has medical evidence he has dementia, no title company will allow him to sign papers.
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In Illinois, a spouse is automatically entitled to 25% of the property with or without a deed. But in a case like this, it may HIS 25% and not yours. Check with a lawyer.
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To be really sure, your friend needs to check with a lawyer. In some jurisdictions, marriage supersedes prior arrangements, even wills, and spouses have certain rights to the principal residence that cannot be waived under any circumstances.
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