My Dad has moderate dementia. He continues to be paranoid of a particular spot in his living space. How can I divert him?

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He STAYS awake all night. I am thinking it is sundowners. He will stay in the bathroom for hours if I don't coax him out. He gets deathly afraid of "something". He is on seraquel 100 mg and trazadone 10mg both at night. He stares in the same spot thinking something is coming to harm him and all of us living here. Space is limited and I can't move him in my home. He has spent time in his home (where he does not remember he owned). He has wandered from my home and his home feeling "they" are after him. He seems to be fine during the day but sundown seems to be getting worse. I try to talk and put something in the space he thinks is torturing. To no avail. We are Medicaid pending and I have been looking into homes. Trying to work out finances BEFORE we officially apply. Keeping him active during the day but night time is very exhausting for him and I !! Need advice on sundowners

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Bless all of you. I will use the suggestions and continue to lean on this life saving caregivers communication vehicle. I have learned so much and so much support has helped me through struggling times.
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We got divorced in April and our lease on this "haunted" house is up this month. He got an apt locally and I'm moving out of state next week. The good news for him is that so far his new place seems to only be occupied by him and his canary.
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Kee, I think you're right on target that the paranoia and/or delusions stem from your father's position as a correction officer. He must have had to be on guard literally all the time, on a high level of alert and prepared literally for anything, and I'm sure that affected him in ways that didn't manifest until now.

Sometimes jobs affect us in ways that are reflected even before we're old. I still have dreams/nightmares of being fired from a law firm because I couldn't keep my billables up to the level demanded of paralegals. I hate to think of what those dreams will segue into in 10 or 20 years.

VegasLady, I'm sorry to learn that your husband has moved out, unless that was an agreement that was mutual. Still, I'm thinking that there's a void left by his absence. I hope you're okay and moving on?
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Thank you all who have responded so quickly. My dad is living with me. He was a correction Officer for 20 plus years. I think his paranoia may be coming from his past occupation. He frequently talks of some people after him with weapons .... I wil try the "chores" with him. I have tried turning the "things" into something I can get 'rid' of. It works only temporarily.
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He moved out this weekend.
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My husband ( now ex) felt that the rental home we moved to last year turned out to be haunted. He saw what he thought were ghosts or spirit faces on the wall or ceiling. His thought process around this was somewhat complicated and he did things to keep the ghosts at bay. He burned sage, scattered salt and garlic, bought holy water, crosses and more
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Keejackson, I am not that familiar with Sundowners and don't know if one could use what adults use to help settle children down when there are monsters under the bed or in the closet.

I see you tried putting something in that spot but to no avail. Wonder if using some type of spray and pretend it will keep the "people" away, or by installing a special light that will shine on the spot to scare away the "people". Children usually accept this, not sure about an elder.
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Try starting a project or activity before sundown, and keep him occupied during the transition. We used to fold clothes in the afternoon, listen to music, or do something that occupies attention and can distract from the unsettled feeling that accompanies the change from daylight to darkness.

What did he enjoy doing? Can he still work puzzles, play cards, or are those too difficult? Could you get him to set the table and help you prepare for dinner?

I do think though that something else is going on which sounds like some type of anxiety or paranoia. Could you try the meds at different times, as they might be keeping him away at night? Is he on Seroquel for depression or another illness?

It's not clear to me if he's living alone or with you.
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