If you cover a live in caregivers food, does that cover fast food?

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Should I specify that she can go to the grocery store and buy her food, but we don't cover fast food places and restaurants? It started when my brother got tired of food at home and wanted fast food himself, so we let her, but now he is on a g tube and won't be eating food.

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Pam, don't those rates assume economies of scale in institutions, though? A snack bar might work out at 84 cents if you're buying the things in bulk from a wholesaler, but what would you get for that money in your local grocery store?
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Maybe it's just me - and even taking into consideration the quoted law regarding meal allowances - if the employee is paid the amount as agreed compensation, how is it anyone's else's business whether she blows it all on one meal at fancy restaurant, eats at Carl's jr. or buys tofu and granola. Seriously!
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That's interesting Pamstegma but doesn't seem like much. Certainly not enough or fast food places.But, as I don't care what she eats, just trying to keeps costs down, I think the idea of just setting an amount and letting her decide what she does with it, is a good idea. Will set it above the CD Workers Law.
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California Domestic Workers Law effective 1/1/2014
Live-in personal attendants are paid overtime when they work more than 9 hours in a day or 45 hours in the 7-day work week. Federal:
Standard Meal Allowance Rates for 2015 income tax returns (in the continental U.S.): for adults and children in care...
$1.66 for each breakfast
$3.04 for each lunch or supper
$0.84 for each snack
That works out to $8.58 per day or $60.06 per week or $257.40 a month.
I would NOT agree to pay for fast food, that would be too expensive.
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I can't imagine why you would want to control what an employee eats. If money is your concern, give her money. Then you can set limits on what legitimately concerns you. Suggest an amount you feel is fair. Be prepared to negotiate a little if necessary. Pay her. End of story.
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Why does it matter what the caregiver eats? If it's a matter of cost, set an allowance as suggested above. I'd would think what they eat is their business unless it somehow interferes with the care that is provided.
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Good idea JeanneGibbs. I wouldn't mind one in a while freqflyer, but for every meal it becomes very expensive.
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If you cover the cost of a live-in caregiver's food, I can't see any problem with covering fast food or a carry-out from a restaurant. Sometimes we all need a break from the kitchen and fast food does the trick.
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How about a food allowance, that she can spend at the grocery or at fast food or any combination?
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