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The nursing facility my father signed my grandmother tried sueing me for $5000, because my father told them HE was Medical POA and I was financial POA.
AFTER HE TRICKED HER INTO DOING REVERSE MORTGAGE AND TOOK ALL IF THE MONEY!! NOW, Im stuck with a hefty loan, IF I WANT THE HOUSE I LIVE IN AND AM HEIR TO

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FF is right; some data is missing as what's been written doesn't make sense, or maybe I'm just not understanding the issues.

More than likely your father was required to provide a copy of the Durable POA when he signed the application and entrance forms to admit your grandmother. The staff would have reviewed them to ensure that he had the power to do so.

A Medical POA grants authority for specified medical decisions. Without checking mine, I don't recall that it authorizes someone to sign as proxy to admit someone for care in a facility.

So I don't understand how a Durable POA could have been presented and any confusion occurred to infer that you held that authority if you didn't.

I'm curious also how your father allegedly "tricked" your grandmother into executing a reverse mortgage. If she has documented dementia and didn't realize what she was doing, the execution of the mortgage may be invalid and the validity of the mortgage itself comes into play.

Are you sure your father didn't execute the Reverse Mortgage under his DPOA authority? Have you actually seen the recorded RM?

More information is needed on this aspect as well.

You state you're heir to the house. Does your father inherit the house as well, i.e., are you both heirs?

Holding the issue of Medicaid out of the picture for the moment, if the reverse mortgage is valid, then you would have to pay it off in order to keep the house. That's probably not likely going to happen because RMs are negatively amortized and the amount owed now will be greater when GM passes.

As to the suit, you wrote the nursing home "tried" - what does that mean? It either filed suit or it didn't. What's the story on this? Did they file and was the suit dismissed or are they threatening?

The title of the post is also confusing. Delegated authority can't just be switched. We need to know who is named as proxy in each of the POAs in order to help you with your this question.

It would also help if you consolidated the issues; it's somewhat awkward to be switching back and forth to 2 other posts to get all the relevant information.
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The POA does not incur personal debt when acting on someone's behalf. If you have been sued, do NOT DELAY. Get legal advice, since doing nothing can make you lose rights in court.

If your father did something improper with her house or money, I would see an attorney to explore what can be done.

To qualify for Medicaid, I bet they wanted to know what happened to the money she got from the Reverse Mortgage. They will follow the paper trail.
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LolaNunya, what papers did you sign with the long term care facility? If you didn't any anything, the nursing home cannot sue you.... something doesn't make sense here.
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If gram is in a nursing home, your dado ably used the money to pay for her care. Somebody has to.and if she has a home, she has at least some means.

Your gram owns that house for HER benefit, not yours. For HER care, not for you to inherit.
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When assets are hidden or misappropriated, Medicaid refuses to pay for a nursing home. The nursing home then sues the people who got the car or the house or the money.
Adding to your problem here is the reverse mortgage. Once a person dies or moves to a nursing home, the mortgage company will foreclose.
So you inherit the house, but you inherit all the debt that comes with it.
Figure out if you can afford to pay off the debts, or plan on moving. Sorry.
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