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My 74 year old husband has Parkinson's and recently has been needing to urinate during the night, this is happening every night and almost hourly. I was advised that it was Parkinson's related, it's draining my husband and I'm not sure how much longer I will be able to cat nap during the day to make up for lost sleep. I am his full time carer and find my patience is being tested beyond control.
Over a month ago he was severely ill having contracted Sepsis due to a UTI. The nurse seems to think it's time to have a catheter fitted but I am worried due to someone saying once that catheters can cause infection. Any information or experiences will be gratefully received.

Thankyou so much.
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Reply to Gallai
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Here's a link to the website: https://www.quickchange.com --click on "Request Sample Pack"

Hope this helps.
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Reply to CLOWE48
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My husband (90) began using a condom catheter after his PCP prescribed Lasix for edema associated with congestive heart failure. Lasix made him have to urinate multiple times a day, which can be tricky for someone with mobility issues, so the catheter was a life saver.

The issues of a condom catheter involve choosing the proper size; keeping it on and avoiding leakage; keeping the area clean and germ free; and using condoms that are allergy-free. Otherwise, catheter use is convenient for male incontinence issues.

If sores, or a rash appear on the penis, condom use must be halted until the skin is intact and healthy. In my search for other options I’ve come across an alternative to the catheter. It’s called the “Quick Change Penile Incontinence Wrap”, and they offer a sample pack. I cannot comment because we have not yet received the sample, but it appears to be a viable solution. Fingers crossed.
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Gallai Mar 2, 2020
I’ve not heard Of the Quick Change Penile Wrap but I’ll try to research it.
presently my husband is using the condom catheter but not without leakage problems he appears to be lying on the tubing and therefore causing a back-flow. He is fairly new to it so maybe just teething problems. Thank you for taking time to reply.
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Thankyou for taking the time to reply. We have two carers who wash and dress my husband in the morning and two in the evening who help put him to bed. Having asked their opinion I was informed that in their experience UTI infection was very common, as my husband is prone to UTI's I'm very reluctant to add to this. However I'm reaching breaking point due to lack of sleep, the district nurse believes by him having a catheter I would manage to sleep leaving me more able to function during the day. Tests carried out by urology are normal therefore doctors are putting this fairly new symptom as being Parkinson's related.
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I agree with Grandma. Catheters are not suggested for people who are prone to UTIs. I go for the use of a condom one.

Also, you may want to have husband start taking a cranberry tablet everyday. No juice, has sugar. While Mom was on antibiotics, she was given a probiotic. It was continued afterwards. She had a UTI in Oct, passed the next Sept. Didn't have another one in that time period.
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Gallai Feb 17, 2020
Hi thankyou for your reply, as a result of this forum I have recently started giving my husband a D Manose tablet each day, I've also been giving him diluted Ocean Spray cranberry juice, orange juice and copious amounts of water in an effort to keep further UTI's at bay. I will look into probiotics thankyou.
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If you opt for an indwelling catheter, in addition to washing your hands before and after you can wear gloves while inserting and removing it and you can also use warm soapy water to keep the tubing clean from the urethra to about 2" down the tubing.

Anything that is inserted into the body can cause infection but practicing good cleanliness and hygiene will cut down on the rate of infection. Also, in the catheter bag that hangs down it is possible to see a potential infection in the bag. Whatever the color the urine is, an infection can look like white-ish, thin and floating wispy matter. Sometimes it's not obvious until you pick up the bag to examine it.
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Reply to Eyerishlass
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Gallai Feb 17, 2020
Thankyou for taking the time to reply.
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There can be an increase of UTI's with catheters. Have you thought about a Condom Catheter? This is fitted on the outside so there is less of a chance of a UTI due to the catheter.
The catheter can remain on for an extended period of time as well. I would give it a try before an internal catheter is tried. I am all for following a least invasive method first.
The condom cath worked well for my Husband I wish I had been able to use it sooner but he had a tendency to "adjust" himself and I was afraid he would pull it off.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Who was the “someone” who told you once that “catheters can cause infection”?

I wash my hands each and every time I cath, with antiseptic soap. We use disposable catheters, which may or may not be possible for your husband. I wipe the private area carefully with a disposable wipe.

As long as you or your husband are fully trained to manage catheterizing, it can be done safely.

I’m not sure that even with cathing, YOUR ability to get your rest will be totally restored. Are you able to come up with any other supports to try? In a similar situation, we went to overnight aides.

Hopig you are doing all you can to be good to yourself.
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