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A few thoughts. First, there are no good across the board solutions. Almost every appliance can be a hazzard, even when new and in good condition. If nothing else, if it can heat things (water, food) to boiling or much hotter, there is the risk of the person spilling food or drink on bare flesh and causing a burn.

Babalou, Those electric kettles (hobs) are supposed to shut themselves OFF when water comes to a boil, but my mother had one that the cut-off failed when it boiled, and it could boil dry. At the higher heat it still shut itself off, for a while. So Mom kept on using it. It finally did not shut off, and set itself on fire, and nearly set the house on fire. Recommendation: periodically check the kettle by boiling a small amount of water, and making sure the shut-off still works while there's water still in it. If it does not, throw it out.

Stoves: gas. There's an open flame that can burn flesh, set paper on fire, ... Electric coil elements get hot enough to set things on fire, and hot enough to burn hands... Electric induction heating elements below a glass top are probably the safest. no danger from contact - they just cause a metal pot to get hot. But the pots' contents can boil dry, and burn. And almost all stoves can be turned on, and then forgotten about. There are some add-on controls for electric stoves.

Microwaves: Metal (aluminum foil, a teaspoon, ...) inside a microwave can spark, and set stuff on fire. And many types of microwaves have very hard to understand digital controls, and often they are hard to read - sytlish light grey fonts on a bronze background. And they can reduce stuff to burned sludge if ON for too long at high power, or used repeatedly on a single cup of coffee. (Mom did this many times. Yuk)

What would be better, and I don't think it yet exists is a good "Warming-only" microwave, that will bring food or drink up to 140ºF or so, but no higher, with a simple "GO" button, with the smarts to not start if there's metal inside. And with a good way of calling the "cook" back, when it done heating. A simple "DING" may be missed, or not understood, or not heard from another room. And it should be good at keeping the contents warmed for a while....

Peter

I'm an inventor, have been looking at electric appliances first from the perspective of a caregiver redesigning things for a person with early-to-middle stage Alzheimer Disease , but then more widely for other disabilities (cognitive, physical, sensory, ..) . I'd be happy to hear directly about others' questions, experiences, solutions, email me at peterz (at) cogpro (dot) ca.
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The microwave oven is a safe choice when it comes to cooking appliances for elderlies but the food choices they would be having would be very limited. How old or what is the condition of the individuals that will be using this appliances? An electric stove is also a safe choice when it comes to cooking facilities. If the person would just be cooking ordinary fried or boiled food, the electric stove is the best option they could have. Or they could always try out delivered home-cooked meals. It will save them time in having to prepare for their meals too.
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Okay, so let's analyze what "cooking" she needs to do? Heat up water? Get her a Hobb ( a plug in kettle that boils water, turns off when it's done, ultimately very safe). What else might she need? A self turn off coffee maker?
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In Independent Living, they have a microwave oven, but no stove. In Assisted Living they are not allowed anything that heats up, for safety reasons. It's all too easy for them to scald themselves with hot food. You can start a fire even with a microwave. How about Meals on Wheels instead?
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If this person doesn't use a gas stove because they're unsafe doing so, I wonder if ANY cooking appliance is going to be helpful or safe.
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