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My son is my husband's caregiver. He works through an agency for the VA. Is an agreement necessary. When he works for someone else (privately) I imagine he should have an agreement.
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There is also no reason to pay a fortune for this agreement. You can look up an attorney on Avvo and find one who does not charge for a consultation.
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It is VERY important to have a care management agreement, especially if Medicaid is in the picture. It is also important to have an attorney draft it for you as Medicaid requires certain verbiage for it to be legal.
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I wouldn't take the risk of doing legal documents for myself. There is no way that a lay person can know all the requirements in your jurisdiction to have a contract or waiver upheld in court down the road. There are too many things to consider. If fiances are an issue, I'd check with local legal aid or volunteer lawyers services.
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Your best bet is to go to a lawyer and explain your needs then see how much they will charge. It will cost more but then you will be protected. Firms online might help but since you don't have the legal knowledge you might make a mistake that makes the form useless. Sometimes it is worth the money to get it done right. Make sure you get a lawyer that knows about elderly and family law. If you are struggling with money tell them, call around, see what deals you can get.
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To expand on this question, do most non-family caregivers carry some type of insurance or have these limited liability contracts? Which is better? Contract or insurance?

I'm new to this (legal issues of caregiving.) my experience has been family only. No legal issues.

Thanks!
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There is no shortage of sources
Just google: liability contract forms for caregivers

One source is :
CARE-GIVING CONTRACTS | ElderLawAnswers
A formal agreement, set up by a lawyer, between the elder and caregiver, (not ... exemption of the caretaker from liability for medical condition of the elder.
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Yes, legally, morally and logistically.
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