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We keep putting bandaids and antibiotic, they get taken off pretty much immediately. What else can I do? Concerned as two spots on her nose are just getting raw.

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I use OTC hydrocortisone ointment often. It doesn't sting any open skin. There are lidocaine + hydrocortisone cream formulations, but if I were you, Beethere, I'd get the ointment and skip the cream. For better results, ask mom's doc for a 2.5% formula. OTC is 1%. It works as a preventative measure, but I don't know how effective it would be to treat. Best of luck.
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Thanks for the tip that it could start itching as it heals, though now barely time to heal. Will try the hydrocortisone, but with an open sore, I think that hurts. Yes, tried the liquid bandage, will try again on the smaller sores, though she will I'm sure pick another spot. Am also looking for small hand held games to keep her distracted. All the answers are helpful
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We had the same problem, the final solution after many trips to the dermatologist and doctor was having the doctor do a "procedure" on the spot. The PA did a great job pretending that she was removing a non existant in grown hair. Once the procedure was done, no more picking.
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Thanks, send - you're sweet!
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Rainmom,
Hope your son is better now. Don't know what to say to comfort you, but what you shared about your struggles is profound, and has really touched my heart.
You must be brave, and stoic. {{{{Hugs}}}}} for you and your family.
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Maybe as a spot is healing, it starts to itch. Then, adding OCD to the mix and its a real problem

Using Benadryl cream may help alleviate the itch, maybe they will forget for a few hours. When you apply it. (for the psychological benefit), make a big deal, sit with the person ten minutes, distract them, focus on something else. Rub their back.
Come back and re-apply it in a few hours. Repeat.

This answer is for the simpler cases, and I hope it helps someone.
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My mother did this in her last months, as the dementia worsened, and so did her mother and grandmother. It's usually an absentminded sort of thing, and they don't even realize they're doing it, until they notice they're bleeding. With Mom, it was a spot on her arm, or the inside of her nose, because the constant use of O2 dried it out. Seemed I was always coming to see her and finding her fingernails and nose bloodied.
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Rainmom ~ I knew there were gloves like that and tried to search for them under some keywords like "protective gloves you can't remove," but didn't come up with anything. I've seen others on here mention using them for people who will pull on things or scratch themselves. I'm glad to learn a term for them.
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My son has severe autism - he has never worn a band-aid in his life. Well, not where he could get to at any rate! Worse yet, if he does manage to get to a bandaide that I thought was in a safe spot, he'll peel it off and pop it into his mouth, chewing it like gum - eewwee! The only solution I have found is to buy Bactine by the gallon and Costco size packages of cotton balls and I clean the area frequently. Rainman was in the hospital for quite a while - two emergency surgeries, a g-tube up his nose, down the back of his throat and into his tummy. Hubby and I slept in shifts - the other holding his hands down - still he was able to get loose and - ZIP - snatched the g-tube out, spraying green slimmy stuff all over. Finally the doctor gave in a ordered "burn mittens". They look like large, white oven mitts with tiny mesh on the back - they tie at the wrist. In our case they also had straps and as long as one of us was in the room at all times we were allowed to tie his hands down to the bed rails - the mitts alone wouldn't have stopped him from removing the tube. Anyhoo - if your moms sore gets infected, perhaps ask her doctor about burn mittens.
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beethere, my mother has the habit of picking at spots on her hand. She has done the same thing on her back in the past. She says she has to go to the dermatologist because she has poison ivy or something that want go away. She'll point at a spot on her hand. Her dermatologist gets pretty put out and says it is self inflicted damage. He gives her a cream (hydrocortisone) and takes the time to inspect for pre-cancerous spots.

My mother has had a hard time with getting old and the things that go with it. When there is dementia, it's hard to get them to stop doing things like picking at a spot. I don't know if it would help your mother to go to a dermatologist and get a cream or something. It helps mine, although I'm sure it is all psychological.
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I used a product earlier today on myself that I'd forgotten about -- it's a nail polish size/type bottle of clear liquid called "skin crack care" or "liquid bandage." You dab it on the spot and it leaves a little bit of goo and seals up the spot. That might be helpful. You could do some repeat dabs throughout the day, 2-3 times a day, and then hopefully all mom is picking off of herself is the coating and not getting into the skin. I don't know that it will work but maybe that's worth a try? If it does work, please report back. :-)
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thanks all. I'm pretty sure it is somewhat of an OCD behaviour, previously (before dementia) controlled for the most part. Have thought of the gloves - I won't even get them on, let alone that they will come off. Mom is still fit as a fiddle. Dr. recommended Namenda, need to see what they say now. Also to see if there is any other creams to use to clear it up. There are more spots, on neck, arms, etc., so I don't think it is that something is/was actually there. But picking at the spot all day doesn't give it a chance to heal, and now I'm worried about other infection taking hold.
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See a dermatologist and get a skin biopsy.
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There was a frequently picked spot on my father's upper lip/lower nose. It turned out to be a spot of skin cancer. Depending on the age and mental ability of this person who's doing the picking, you want to have them screened to rule that out. :-)
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Is it more than just an obsessive-compulsive action? As long as medical pros - and specifically a dermatologist - has cleared it as being only obsessive picking, what about wrapping up the hands instead of the face? Can you cut the nails extra short and put cotton gloves on?

If the bandaids come off immediately, so might the gloves. You could try it easily enough, though.
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