Conservatorship, how do you let the wards have a NON-cash allowance?

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Once granted Conservatorship, the bank would not let the wards have control of their accounts. I understand the reasoning but due to another person in the family having guardianship, the wards need money to eat out or for co-pays at the doctors office when the guardian takes them to those. Conservatorship paperwork states everything must be accounted for, and paid by check. Restaurants don't accept checks.

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drkernisan, I use a prepaid debit card myself. I know this works for anyone at any age because if you have multiple bank accounts, there are ways to make it work. The first step is to remember that you can actually open to checking account and a savings account. You can set up direct deposit into the main account. You can then have all of your bills set up through the bill pay system but set it up on your end. Then, have all of your extra money automatically routed between your second checking account and your savings account. You can have only what you need routed to the account of your choice. Make sure your name is on all of those accounts. Give a card to the person you're taking care of with the limited amount on it. Mark the back of the card with a special marking that only you know. This can be the card you give to the person you're taking care of. These days you really don't need to carry cash anymore, you can load it all onto a prepaid card attached to your bank account. These cards are the same as a regular card, it's just prepaid and attached to the bank account. You run them as credit
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What about giving the wards a prepaid debit card? The True Link Card was originally designed to protect vulnerable older adults from financial abuse, but now they are also marketing themselves a solution for guardians and fiduciaries.

I have not used the card personally and am not associated w the company. But seems like a sensible approach to a very common problem.
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There must be a compromise... Perhaps the receipt from the co-pays, reasonable dinners out, and other personal needs could be reimbursed to the guardian who attends to these matters. With a receipt, there is a paper trail showing the wards money was spent on/for their needs.
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