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If it gets complicated, I lose it.... is there a simple way to ensure mom gets her wishes for a No Resuscitation order when the time comes? We have the signed Advanced Directive by our Upcap (Area Agency on Aging whose purpose is to advocate for and provide services to older adults residing in the Upper Peninsula) representative says that's not going to stop them from reviving her, that the medical team will still administer life saving measures even when mom says no in her Advanced Directive. She's still able to sign and make her wishes known at the present time. thank you!

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We put a zip lock bag with a list of all mom's meds, doctor's names and numbers, family names and numbers and a copy of her advanced directive/DNR on the back of her door when she lived at home and later in her Independent Living apt. It had a big label on it that said IN CASE OF EMERGENCY. Each time 911 was called, the emts mentioned how helpful it was.
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Thank you so much, Veronica91
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Jocelyne once you get the DNR properly signed make sure you have several copies including one for your self in your purse at all time. There should be one in her chart at wherever she is living and give her one too. EMTs are particularily hard to convince!
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Thanks for the explanation. I understand now. Sometimes I have the same problem, especially when trying to decipher tax instructions.

I'm glad NoJoy gave you the information you needed.
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That is exactly what I am looking for..... thank you so much, Nojoy3. I appreciate it!
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Ask her doctor for a "Physician Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment" also known as a "POLST" form. This is what it is called in our state, may go by a different name in your state. It is a form giving instructions to all healthcare providers including EMTs regarding her treatment wishes. Apparently this form takes the lead over an advanced directive especially in an emergency situation. Her doctor should know what official form you need.
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Thank you for your response... I had heard conflicting recommendations, that's what made me say "I lose it"... that is, understanding what's really required. Since I have asked the question, I have found this form online and believe it is what I need. Mom already has her Adv. Directive signed, but because someone questioned it, I was concerned. Here is what I found, and I think this is all I need. Thank you very much...

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/DNR_update_March_14_final_release_453815_7.pdf
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I'm confused by your statement that you lose "it" if "it gets complicated". Are you referring to your authority under the Advanced Directive or the concept and specific issues of medical personnel adhering to the terms of the AD and DNR order?

What's the background of the "representative" that advised you that the DNR won't stop life saving measures?

I think it really depends on the terms of the DNR - it should specify what the conditions are for action and/or inaction - and it should be specific enough that medical personal can interpret your mother's wishes.

I'm assuming you're in Michigan. There aren't that many hospital facilities in the UP; I believe that the UP Health Care System which apparently acquired Marquette General is one, but there aren't that many choices as there are in the LP. If you're in the Marquette area, have you contacted a hospital administrator to get their position on ADs?

I'm wondering if the UpCap rep thinks that would be the issue? Or is it the" not legal enough" issue, and what are the issues with that? You wrote that your mother can still sign - are you saying that the DNR hasn't been signed yet?

Sorry, I'm just not able to understand the representative's position. Could you explain a little bit more please?

I also think that if you can afford an estate planning or elder law attorney to prepare the AD, that's the better way to go. They'll know what to include to make the document "legal enough."
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