We are concerned about parents getting lost while driving. They don't drive anywhere long distance. Any idea of a tracking device?

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They just drive around town to stores; farmers market, out to eat. everytime an elderly person goes missing in area it makes my sister and I think how would we trace our parents. They have a cell but seem to never have it on when they take it with them. They don't drive every day so we really don't want to pay a monthly fee plus large setup cost. Would be interested in ideas. Thank you.

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NYDIL, very helpful and interesting research.
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Garden, here's stats I found from the CDC about older adult drivers: "In 2012, more than 5,560 older adults were killed and more than 214,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes. This amounts to 15 older adults killed and 586 injured in crashes on average every day. There were almost 36 million licensed older drivers in 2012, which is a 34 percent increase from 1999. Per mile traveled, fatal crash rates increase noticeably starting at ages 70‒74 and are highest among drivers age 85 and older. This is largely due to increased susceptibility to injury and medical complications among older drivers rather than an increased tendency to get into crashes. Age-related declines in vision and cognitive functioning (ability to reason and remember), as well as physical changes, may affect some older adults' driving abilities. Across all age groups, males had substantially higher death rates than females." And according to Consumer Reports: "Drivers 80 and older are involved in 5.5 times as many fatal crashes per mile driven as middle-aged drivers." Back in February of 2014 Witsend2 asked "Parents have had increasing dementia for past 15 years (mom) and past year (dad). They both drive. Are we liable?" Although some posters responded 'yes' even when the answer is 'no' people sue first and ask questions later. And the whole process costs lots of money and time. The way we handled driving with my inlaws was explaining the legal system to them - the long, drawn out, expensive, time consuming legal process - so they understood what would happen if they hit a person while driving: all their medical records would be laid bare to the court, their car insurance premiums would skyrocket, etc.
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Well said, Windy.

Llama, just b/c someone becomes lost is hardy the basis for concluding that "that means their eyes are not where they should be". That applies more to texters and cell phone talkers than older people, with whom there can be vision issues but there can also be cognitive issues. With someone texting, it's just sheer irresponsibility if not stupidity.

Would you advocate preventing a texter from driving? I certainly would, just as adamantly as I would argue that someone driving in impaired state should not be driving.

How many people are killed by drunk driviers? How many by elder drivers? And how many by texters? Let's see the stats.
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Llama, I have no idea what NSA is referring to, it was mentioned by another poster, not me.

This is a good discussion and the issue comes up quite often on this forum. There is no one answer for each situation. My very first post on this forum several months ago was about elders driving and I shared the info about the GPS tracking system I had just begun using. I was immediately chastised by another poster for being irresponsible and told myna dad had no business driving. I have also seen many posts where the elder has had wrecks, gotten lost, driven through the garage door etc. and I have advised that the driving should be ended immediately. In some cases there is no question that things have continued far too long and there is immediate danger to the driver and the public. As much as I would like to get the keys from my Dad at this point I have no justification to do so. It would involve a physical confrontation. He has not gotten lost, no dings or scratches, no fender benders, no tickets, nothing. I recently took a ride with him to the grocery store and was amazed at how well he does. But with his dementia I know it won't be long before I have to intervene and it will be nasty. He is not about to let his young punk son tell him what to do.

So I watch him every day on my GPS and mom can call me or 4 grandsons and we can all access the GPS system on I phones or laptops in a second if a trip to the store takes too long. So far she has yet to alert us to any problems.

While there are many similarities to the problem of elders driving there are also many different situations and methods for dealing with driving and resolving the situation. My GPS works for me, at the moment, but may not be effective for others.
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I don't think they should be driving any more. If they're looking for their lost way, that means their eyes are not where they should be. Good heavens, if they hit and kill a pedestrian, that's called vehicular manslaughter.
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Has anyone stood in line at the local DMV lately, and taken a look at who they are giving a license to or, renewing a license for? At least a senior has experience.
However, common sense when on any meds, or once a diagnosis of dementia is made, (get a second opinion); did you know that with epilepsy people should not drive? Take a look at the car, are there too many new dings?
My friend had a neighbor who repaired her car before her adult children could see the dings, and dents! She was 90. It is really not age related, to some extent.
Always give the elder the benefit of the doubt by reporting anonymously to the DMV, let them re-test and decide.
Have you ever been in the car with someone and they just stopped (no stop sign, no light) as if there was a stop sign? That could be one of the bad signs we're not always aware of.
Safe driving everyone!
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I HAD my husband's license taken away for everyone's safety, It was hard on him, but his feelings have lighten up and is getting use to our family driving him around .He has dementia and is starting to roam. I am looking for a bracelet/watch I can get him and I get find him on my phone or unit. Any suggestions would be helpful. thank you
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One of really scary things about impaired drivers is the possibility of getting onto the wrong side of a freeway or divided road. But hazards are all around us--my aunt was killed when her elderly husband sideswiped a retaining wall on a road very near their house.
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GardenArtist, Yes, they went over all the statistics re reaction time, night vision, depth perception, peripheral vision, higher fatality rates for seniors, and much more. They also made comparisons to teen drivers. The legal age is 16 in my state. I didn't let my son get his license at 16. He got it at 20 when he was more responsible and he is a great driver.
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Windyridge: What does NSA have to do with this?????
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