Should I be concerned that my 92 year old grandmother that lives independently sleeps until 2 o'clock in the afternoon?

Follow
Share

I have a 92 year old mother is living independently. I see her about 3 times per week and occasionally stay over. In the past 3 months she has started sleeping until about 2 pm even if she goes to bed around 10 pm. Is this normal body aging or should I be concerned? She says she enjoys sleeping late.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
15

Answers

Show:
Of course she's earned a rest!! Now tell me --- who is going to provide it? In my case, my mom has problems saying "please" and "thank you". If you read in the trread about dysfunctional families, hello - I'm one of those. My dear sweet old mother was never a warm person. She is neither domestic nor maternal. She had me because her birth control failed. (I heard that quite often) she is the poster child for passive-aggressive, and I am the only person she's got! I told her a thousand times, make alist of things you would like me to do- she doesn't. Why? Because that would be asking!
I have dropped my life, moved to a city I don't want to live in, have no support group except for you guys. I can't find a job here to save my life and I'm so depressed that I start each day with self-loathing. I need help, but have no insurance. I haven't been to a doctor in two years. So, capnhardass, you step into my shoes and pull this plow --- I need a freaking break! And THAT'S what I will accomplish. She will either be the person she tells everyone she is (independent) or she will learn to ask for help like everyone else does.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

them cows aint gonna milk themselves.
honestly, at 92 the shower could turn rainbow colored and i wouldnt care. dont ya think maybe the old gal is tired?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Since Feburary, when I last posted on this thread, my mom has gotten worse. I bought a tiny place down the street from her ( formerly shared a house -- a nightmare) and I have found that she is worse. She sleeps in that chair all day. Other women in her age group around here garden and putter all day or they stay in the house and do nothing.
So, I've decided to stop enabling her entropy. I quit as her landscaper and house cleaner, and cut back to three days a week as her cook. I still walk over there 2-3 times a day and I am available, but she needs to get off her butt and do something. She can hire someone or do it herself, but I am no longer going to function as her unpaid lackey. She insisted that she wanted to live independently, so she needs to do it. I was stupid to jump in and help, all she did was lean more and more on me. I personally think that she needs to live in an apartment. She can't manage a house, no matter how small!! ( This is a nice 55+ mobile home park). Poor thing has never been maternal or domestic, so me taking over all the unpleasant details was perfect -- for her. I'll step in before the shower is completely green, but I don't live there. She needs to WAKE UP and DO SOMETHING or she will slide right in to dementia and I'm not capable of fixing that!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

At 93, she's earned that right! Seriously, what body doesn't need more sleep with age?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Older people don't sleep as soundly as they used to. And they get tired with less activity and it takes more to recover. My mom sleeps more than she used to. We both try to just listen to our body's signals and sleep when tired and eat when hungry. And when you are older, at least there is some degree of freedom to do so.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I would in any of these situations have a doctor evaluate your parent. As mentioned in many of the answers.. could just be aging process, heart problems etc.. It has been my understanding that a healthy elder requires less sleep. But of they are declining they would sleep more. But one option not mentioned is medication. A majority of seniors are on several meds. One or a combo may be causing drowsiness. And if the meds co.e from different doctors, its important to check w a pharmacist to be sure they're ok to take together. Mmy grandmother went through some scary behavior for a while and was even violent before they discovered it was med related and potentially lethal. And that was in a nursing home.always check behind the caretakers. They can and will make mistakes unintentionally.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I would in any of these situations have a doctor evaluate your parent. As mentioned in many of the answers.. could just be aging process, heart problems etc.. It has been my understanding that a healthy elder requires less sleep. But of they are declining they would sleep more. But one option not mentioned is medication. A majority of seniors are on several meds. One or a combo may be causing drowsiness. And if the meds co.e from different doctors, its important to check w a pharmacist to be sure they're ok to take together. Mmy grandmother went through some scary behavior for a while and was even violent before they discovered it was med related and potentially lethal. And that was in a nursing home.always check behind the caretakers. They can and will make mistakes unintentionally.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

As my mom was aging I remember wondering what would happen and when. How would I know what to do? Would it be many days or would it be tomorrow? Would she be in pain and what could I do for her? Hopefully the story of my mom's passing will help you. You may have many years ahead of you with your grandmother and I hope they are pleasant and kind years.

My mom lived independently until she passed at nearly 93 yrs old. She told us no extraordinary measures, but she did indeed want to continue to live. As with the others this is just to affirm that she slept a lot, but it was more waking early in the morning, then a morning nap, an afternoon nap and then off to bed at night.

She had friends in a healthy bones exercise class that she went to twice a week. She had me and other children and grandchildren, mostly on the phone and her two sisters, on the phone. She read a lot, was cranky at times and happy and kind at other times. I think she was cranky mostly because she was a little scared.

One night she went to bed with an apple and banana at her night stand. When I checked in on her at 9 am she had eaten half the apple and part of the banana, but she had passed away some time early that morning. My cardiologist said dying that way was fast and painless. She lost consciousness and never struggled.

Many people say it was a blessing:
That she lived independently
She was mostly comfortable
Not hospitalized or moved away from her home and things
Lived a long time
Was loved...

Still we all miss her every day. For the time she was here with us, she needed a lot of sleep, starting with one nap and that went on for years, increasing as time went on.
Helpful Answer (8)
Report

Sonny - when she is awake between 2 PM - 10 PM, does she do things, does she eat and drink enough, can she do her ADL's? Has she done any wandering at night? Is she aware of the time, like she knows @ 5:30 PM it's the evening news.

If she really seems cognitive of the day and time and can do her ADL's, then I'd chalk it up to normal aging. Lucky you and very lucky her! But if not, I'd have her evaluated by a gerontologist to see if there could be a dementia happening and medication to slow down the progression of the disease. My mom was in IL @ your mom's age and no real issues but she was in a gerontology group and was on Exelon pill and Remeron. Then @ 94, she started missing putting her "I'm up" door sign on her IL apt door and making it to lunch as she was sleeping past noon, then wandering at night and having significant weight loss and dehydration issues. One thing that did help the last year or so she was in IL was to get torch-style lights and put them on timers in her bedroom and living room so that there would be light up in the rooms on a regular consistent cycle to make her realize it's daytime and you should be up. Table lamps didn't do this, plus she could more easily turn these off. She would nap during the day if need be but the lights reinforced the cycle of day & night. Really I think this kept her from NH for 1 yr.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

As we age, melatonin is depleted and if one sleeps during the day then the circadian rhythm is upset. Physical activity during the day is best and a routine where one goes to bed at a specific time and arises in the morning to see the sun which will stimulate melatonin. Sleeping too much is also a sign of depression especially early morning sleeping. Get her to a mental health professional, check her eating habits, and physical activity. All these can generate a more balanced sleep pattern. Best of health to you and her! (a nurse)
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions