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Mil has always been pretty hyper personality wise and alzheimers seemed to make it worse. She has always been a nervous talker, a chatter box. All of a sudden she seems rather subdued and is talking less and is slow in her speech. (Kind of like a very depressed person gets ). Is this part of the progression?

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My FIL stopped talking although he was a man of few words. First, it was difficult for him (my mom too) to follow a conversation with more than one person talking or in a quiet place (sans TV, radio, etc.).
Secondly, you had to start speaking slowly and always looking at them so they could see, hear you clearly.
Don't speak more than one thought, sentence or 2 at a time -- pause and give them a moment to process before you go on.
Lastly, it could be a stroke, mild brain bleed or other.

Agee with others, if this is sudden behavior change, go to ER and have checked out.
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A severe stroke damaged my dad's vocal chords, and he could no longer speak.
Do check with her doctor.
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arianne777: Yes, the "aunt Rachel had a pig" story of repeating the same, exact statement 1,001 X over is part of the aging process. It does get old to keep listening to, but they can't help it. I only hope as I age that I don't bother someone who is on the receiving end of "my pig" story! But I may and I won't have control over it!
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This is not advice, just a comment about my late husband's speech. When first diagnosed with Alzheimer's, he told detailed stories about how, as a teenagers, he used to help his Aunt Rachel on her farm. The stories entailed farm life, kinds and numbers of livestock. The last entire story was, "Aunt Rachel had a pig." Do have your mother checked for possible stroke.

As the Alzheimer's progressed, he talked only about what Aunt Rachel fed the pig. The last time he mentioned the farm, his complete story was, "Aunt Rachel had a pig." Do take all the advice here about checking with a doctor.
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Meat loaf with mashed spuds and gravy!
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Gewallac, my cousin also has Vascular dementia and she does the same thing. Recently, I was asking about one of her favorite dishes, which is mashed potatoes and gravy. I asked if she wanted me to bring her some. She said, Oh, yes, I want the Mexico with gravy. I knew what she meant. lol And, I'm taking her some for her birthday next week!
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My husband is in the moderate stage of vascular dementia. It is now much harder for him to remember words so he talks slow trying to get them out. And sometimes he just can not find the words. Most of the time I know what he is trying to say.
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It could mean one of 2 things
#1 no so bad -she's trying to get her thoughts together
#2 URGENT - STROKE, BUT I WANT TO URGE YOU IF SHE'S HAD A STROKE, TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
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She may have had a stroke or any number of things. You need to make an appt with her primary ASAP.
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My mom was a talker also...as her Alz. progressed she spoke less and less until she was non-verbal....much like a child (except in reverse) she went from full sentences, to 2-3 word sentences and then to 1 word responses and lastly, she became silent....it may very well be the dementia stealing her words and thoughts away. I am so sorry for you! Blessings, Lindaz
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I would definitely have her doctor check her out. She could have had a small stroke.
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Check for a possible UTI. This infection can really change their personality too.
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If it's very sudden, I think I would have her doctor involved to figure it out. It could be caused by a number of things. From what I've read, Alzheimers is a gradual process, whereas other types, like Vascular are in a more sudden stepped down fashion. Does she have a history of stroke?
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