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I have read the book Awakening from Alzheimer's by Peggy Sarlin, so there is many advisers what to use for Dementia people. Has anybody tried it?

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Pine bark and pine needle are best taken as a powder extract ... 1/4 tsp twice daily in warm water. The taste is slightly bitter so some honey can be added, but I have grown to like the taste of the pine!
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Both of these natural products will assist the body ...nobody has mentioned pine bark or pine needle. I have been taking pine bark and pine needle for the last 6 months and have noticed an increase in both energy and that I feel warmer. Studies show that pine can assist the blood vessels to expand/relax allowing more blood to circulate the tissues. Gingko of course is well known for assisting too.
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Coconut oil has medium chain trans-fatty acids that help the brain synapses to fire. As for pycnogenol (pine bark) it is a powerful antioxidant. I used both for my mother when her caregiver could remember to give her the coconut oil laced vanilla pudding. You need 3 T per day of the oil. If it's easier, you might try supplementing with medium chain trans-fatty acid in pill form. The coconut oil doesn't help everybody, but those that it does help swear by it.
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I believe my father had 3 more years until he fell using the mangosteen supplement
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Increase the good (natural) fats and decrease the carbs,and you may notice an improvement.
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I used coconut oil (twice a day) for my mother 4 months and found absolutely ***NO** improvement. I discontinued using it. It does make a great skin lotion. It is also a stool softener/laxative effect. That's another reason why I stopped using it.
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Many very ethical reserchers and physicians have been "stripped" of their credentials by their boards, because if they are right, the main stream - living in the dark ages - physicians, boards and their "peers" are threatened by being proven wrong. EVERY disease is curable, we just may not yet know the cure. Too bad that the main stream medical establishment has more invested in suppressing the cure and keeping the big pharmaceutical companies in power than in helping people.
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I ate a low fat, high complex carb diet for over 40 years. And although I was in better shape than many of my peers, I still had "minor" health issues, such as trouble sleeping, waking up, and 10 years of hot flashes. I am doing much better now that I have switched to a high fat, low carb diet. I have been an ovo-lacto vegetarian for 40 years, and am still an ovo-lacto vegetarian. So the meat industry has no power over me. Sure, some people eat a lot of fat. But they also eat a lot of carbs. I recommend drastically reducing the carbs. It's made a big difference for me. The proof is in the pudding, as they say.
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Now I AM putting a spoon of coconut oil (a heaping teaspoon) in my mother's food twice a day. I really can't tell much of a difference; however, it DOES prevent constipation.
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You have to remember there are only TWO sources of food the brain can take: Oxygen and carbohydrates. That's it.
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America is eating a pretty high fat diet anyway already--very few eat low fat-- it's still a stroke and heart attack nation. I don't buy it. The meat industry pays politicians multimillions and often sponsors these studies.
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If you research cutting edge medical researchers on the web, you'll find that coconut oil (as well as other good natural fats) will work better if you can reduce the carbohydrates (sugars and starches) in the diet. A higher natural fat and a lower carbohydrate ratio can help various brain disorders, as well as seizures.
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wolflover451: Oooopps . Here is working link to information on Stephen Barrett.

http://www.quackpotwatch.org/quackpots/quackpots/barrett.htm
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Aloha wolflover451: The comments and information at the link were about a "Dr." Steve Barrett that koufax identified as someone critical of Dr. Carolyn Dean in his effort to discredit her. 'Dr.' Barrett is the one who has been stripped of his license and his testimony is banned in every US court with a penalty for anyone trying to use it. I've included links in all of the messages above so that others can look into this issue and decide for themselves who is the 'quack' and who is not. Information on Dr. Dean can be found at. Apologies is any confusion created. Alzheimer's is a lengthy illness that affects the individual, the family and community and the more we learn and are aware of the better our care and compassion becomes. Mahalo to all who care and blessings to all affected!!
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I am confused by MauiSkye1 in the one post you made it sound like this "Dean" person was good and then you went on for a large amount of article on him being bad. Personally I didn't know the person, read the book or whatever, but it seems like we are praising and bashing in one article. My only thought is that this disease of Dementia is terrible, we should all do the best we can when dealing with our loved one, treasure what time we have and pray that when the time comes, our loved one is not in pain but will become one in Heaven with wings of painfree love.
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And what are you selling with an attitude that says there is no cure? Hope and education and a better antidote to fear than hopelessness is. Does your facility offer their services for free? Your only complaint about Dr. Dean is 'validated' you say by a man who's testimony is banned in every US court with penalty to anyone using his well paid for opinions in court. Or perhaps, you still haven't read the link provided below. I do not work at a 'place'. I have provided in-home care for over 12 families during the course of 20 years as a home-health and hospice aide and speak only from my own experience. Hope matters, whether you can acknowledge that or not is up to you, but I feel that most reading this are intelligent enough to make decisions for themselves based on their own research. All blessings and hope to all who are affected in any way by dementia.
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Sounds like you are a little to touchy to see what's in front of your face. Dean is a snake oil salesman that is trying to rip off people in need. You say you work at place? I have run a facility for the last 18 years and I know there is no cure for dementia. As you do also. Don't respond to this I have heard enough of your nonsense and nobody else wants to hear your rantings. Do whatever it is you want, it matters not to me.
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Here is link to reviews of another book that Alzheimer's families find very useful.

amazonAlzheimers-Caregivers-Guide-Sourcebook-Edition/dp/0471379670/ref=pd_cp_b_1
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For those wishing to read the complete report on Stephen Barret (MD???) mentioned by Koufax, please read this report. . .
quackpotwatchquackpots/quackpots/barrett.htm

For those wanting more info on Dr. Carolyn Dean MD ND and Alzheimer's
drcarolyndean/2013/07/magnesium-alzheimers/

For those wishing to read reviews of her Everything Alzheimer's Book
http://www.amazon/The-Everything-Alzheimers-Book-Information/dp/B007MXHQ7I

I have worked as an in-home caregiver for over 12 families and feel that all deserve to best and most current info available. Coconut oil and it use are only a part of that when in comes to overall nutrition. All love to those challenged with coping with effects of Alzheimer's.
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Apparently you didn't read the report on your esteemed Steve Barret . . really sad that people like you would encourage those affected by Alzheimer's to not seek all avenues of information in making decisions that are so important. Your information on Dr. Carolyn Dean is VERY outdated and inaccurate so I would advise that you use the Internet to get up to speed. Reviews of her books on Amazon will tell a completely different story about how many her scientific information has helped. If you have a loved one with Alzheimer's my hope is that ALL the best in current information will come to you.

Stephen Barrett - Professional Crackpot...
The Internet needs health information it can trust. Stephen Barrett doesn't provide it...

Barrett is one of those people whose ambitions and opinions of himself far exceeds his abilities. Without ANY qualifications he has set himself up as an expert in just about everything having to do with health care - and more.

And this from a man who is a professional failure.

Records show that Barrett never achieved any success in the medical profession. His claim to being a "retired Psychiatrist" is laughable. He is, in fact, a "failed Psychiatrist," and a "failed MD."

The Psychiatric profession rejected Barrett years ago, for Barrett could NOT pass the examinations necessary to become "Board Certified." Which, is no doubt why Barrett was, throughout his career, relegated to lower level "part time" positions.

Barrett, we know, was forced to give up his medical license in Pennsylvania in 1993 when his "part-time" employment at the State Mental Hospital was terminated, and he had so few (nine) private patients during his last five years of practice, that he couldn't afford the Malpractice Insurance premiums Pennsylvania requires.

In a job market in the United States, where there is a "doctor shortage," Stephen Barrett, after his termination by the State mental Hospital, couldn't find employment. He was in his mid-50s at the time. He should have been at the top of his craft - yet, apparently, he couldn't find work.

It is obvious, that, after one humiliation after another, in 1993 Barrett simply gave up his medical aspirations, turned in his MD license, and retreated, in bitterness and frustration, to his basement.

It was in that basement, where Barrett took up "quackbusting" - which, in reality, means that Barrett attacks "cutting-edge" health professionals and paradigms - those that ARE achieving success in their segment of health care.

And there, in "quackbusting" is where Barrett finally found the attention and recognition he seems to crave - for, a while, that is, until three California Judges, in a PUBLISHED Appeals Court decision, took a HARD look at Barrett's activities, and declared him "biased, and unworthy of credibility."

Bitterness against successful health professionals is Barrett's hallmark. To him they're all "quacks." In this, his essays are repetitive and pedestrian.

Barrett, in his writings, says the same things, the same way, every time - change the victim and the subject, and still you yawn your way through his offerings. It's like he's filling out a form somebody gave him...

Take an overactive self importance, couple it with glaring failure and rejection in his chosen profession, add a cup of molten hatred for those that do succeed, pop it in the oven - and out comes Stephen Barrett - self-styled "expert in everything."

Barrett, we know, along with his website, was named, among other things, in a racketeering (RICO) case in Federal Court in Colorado.

He's also being sued for his nefarious activities in Ontario, Canada.

Barrett, in the Canadian case, has formally admitted, according to Canadian law, to a number of situations put to him by the Plaintiff, including:

"The sole purpose of the activities of Barrett & Baratz are to discredit and cause damage and harm to health care practitioners, businesses that make alternative health therapies or products available, and advocates of non-allopathic therapies and health freedom."

"Barrett has interfered with the civil rights of numerous Americans, in his efforts to have his critics silenced."

"Barrett has strategically orchestrated the filing of legal actions in improper jurisdictions for the purpose of frustrating the victims of such lawsuits and increasing his victims costs."

"Barrett failed the exams he was required to pass to become a Board Certified Medical Doctor."

Read the book rather than hide in ignorance. Those affected by Alzheimer's deserve
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Dementia, with its different causes and different rates of progression is very challenging to study. With most illnesses, researchers are able to do double-blind studies to objectively test a potential treatment. In a double-blind study, patients with the same illness are matched, with each person in the match receiving a different, or no, treatment. There is currently no way to match dementia sufferers because of the inability to make definitive diagnosis until autopsy and the widely varying rates of progression. As a result, the snake oil salesmen thrive. Even the widely accepted treatments such as Namenda have a disclaimer in their advertisements. It seems like every time a new miracle "treatment" comes around, it seems to work for a few, but not for many. Is it really helping, or is there a placebo effect? Meanwhile, someone is lining their pockets because of the desperate search for an effective treatment. I am skeptical of anyone who is making big bucks off of their "discoveries". If you wait a few months, more than likely new information will come out disputing the effectiveness of this new treatment. Save your money.
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Maui, there have always been and always will be snake oil salesmen and there will always be suckers out there that believe in a magic pill or elixir to save the day and solve problems with little or no effort. Now as it was then, you never trust people that are making a profit off of people in trouble. That is what this "Dr." Dean is doing. She was striped of her license to practice and she ran to another state rather then fight it. That would tell most people something. Wake up, smell the coffee. Stop being a sucker.
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Aloha Koufax, Is this the Steve Barrett MD you are referring to? If so, I think you should look for a better source of information on Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Peer reviews sometimes amount to the same things as politics and corporate greed that continually give them selves increased wages. I prefer using a system such as TCM that pays the practitioner for curing the patient rather than killing them. Traditional Chinese Medicine applies principles that treating the entire body and not just what relieves a symptom and not the cause. I have worked with people that benefited from completely restored health when using 'un-tested' methods considered holistic. When it comes to using holistic treatments I do not approve of 'self-medicating' without advice of a 30 year practitioner such as Dr Dean. Doctors live in fear of condemnation by big pharma that has made it illegal for 'doctors' to prescribe anything other than pharmaceuticals that come with warning that would cause anyone to wonder why they are legal in the first place. Most of these illnesses respond to lifestyle changes that would make prescriptions unnecessary in the first place. I was recently told that I had high blood pressure and that I should see my doctor after the test was given inappropriately by an inexperienced health aide. Given my lifestyle and other perfect health factors, I will have the test regiven by someone who knows how to administer it properly, but wonder how many others have been tested by the same aide and have been given high blood pressure medications that were unnecessary. Those interested may want to look into a recently produced documentary called 'Bought'. Very eye-opening as to the incentive for profit that has resulted in deceit and countless unnecessary deaths.
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Weight control helps. I noticed my mom put on six pounds, but I've been feeding her more than usual. I cut back on dinner plate servings where we both eat lightly in the evening, and it's helping us both lose weight gradually. I'm not a believer in diets, but simply cut back. I mean like if you get a second helping of cereal for breakfast keep it at one serving, but don't count carbs or calories. Weight loss is a permanent lifestyle. You can eat all those foods you like, even rice, but keep it at smaller servings.
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Oh definitely do NOT give coconut oil if a person has issues that is opposite constipation. Now what I do know that benefits very elderly people, especially with Alzheimer's, if it's possible, take the person on walks -- only a few minutes a day. Just to the point they get a little tired but not much. Use a walker. You see they tend to like to sit all day and watch television, which makes them weaker. The walks will help prevent falls, and DOES help their mind. I live near a park and I take my mom on walks--only a few minutes a day weather permitting. I have these trees for "landmark" and we reach that tree, and go a little further. then back to the car. The fresh air does them good. She gets in her moods where she won't want to go and I REMIND her firmly she will be falling and I can't pick her up. She gets her shoes on and there we go. I know it's an overall downward spiral, but the walks do slow it down. They do prevent injury. I think walking is the best medicine. I also give her GREEN TEA during the day, which helps keep her awake. Just a cup a day. She loves it, and it will help keep them awake. She tends to sleep all night as long as the green tea is given during the day.
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Cetude, and think about it another way, if coconut oil prevents constipation it must cause havoc on those with that opposite problem, like my mom.
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The coconut oil may be okay to try-if anything it may help prevent constipation. But be careful with using herbs because it can have very serious side effects with prescription medications. herbs such as turmeric and may even damage the liver or thin the blood, affect platelets, etc. This can be catastrophic if a person is on Coumadin, aspirin or other agents that thin or inhibit clotting.
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Just because they wrote books does NOT make a person an "authority". I mean anybody can write a book. You need to do your research and find authoritative sources from science and medical journals, preferably PEER REVIEWED.
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Disciplinary Action against Carolyn Dean, M.D.

Stephen Barrett, M.D.

In 1995, after reviewing her care of 36 patients, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (Canada) concluded that Carolyn Dean, M.D. was unfit to practice and revoked her registration certificate. The College's case summary (shown below) states:

After being notified in 1993 that a disciplinary hearing would be held, Dean relocated to New York and did not contest the charges against her.
Dean had used unscientific methods of testing such as hair analysis, Vega and Interro testing, iridology and reflexology as well as treatment not medically indicated and of unproven value, such as homeopathy, colonic irrigations, coffee enemas, and rotation diets.
She did not individualize her patients and objectively try to reach an appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Rather she allowed her bias toward candidiasis and perceived immunodeficiency problems to cause her to pre-diagnose patients without individualizing them.
Dean obtained a California medical license in 1993 but does not appear to have practiced there. After her Ontario license was revoked, the California authorities initiated action that led to a stipulated decision and order in 1999 under which she was placed on three years' probation but could not practice until she passed the Special Purpose Examination (SPEX), a test used to to determine basic medical knowledge. She was also required to take 120 more hours of continuing medical education than is normally required for license renewal.

Dean's current Web site states that she "specializes in managing and healing misdiagnosed and chronic conditions such as digestive problems, hormone imbalance, yeast overgrowth (Candida) recurring infection, irritable bowel syndrome, widespread inflammation, allergies, anxiety, fibromyalgia, mood swings, chronic fatigue syndrome, fluid retention, lost vitality, and other conditions that are not satisfactorily controlled." During the past several years, she has offered email and telephone consultations for which she charges $200 per hour. In 2008, she notified her supporters that she was moving to Hawaii and in 2010 would open a "medical spa" called VitaCosta in Costa Rica.
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Disciplinary Action against Carolyn Dean, M.D.

Stephen Barrett, M.D.

In 1995, after reviewing her care of 36 patients, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (Canada) concluded that Carolyn Dean, M.D. was unfit to practice and revoked her registration certificate. The College's case summary (shown below) states:

After being notified in 1993 that a disciplinary hearing would be held, Dean relocated to New York and did not contest the charges against her.
Dean had used unscientific methods of testing such as hair analysis, Vega and Interro testing, iridology and reflexology as well as treatment not medically indicated and of unproven value, such as homeopathy, colonic irrigations, coffee enemas, and rotation diets.
She did not individualize her patients and objectively try to reach an appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Rather she allowed her bias toward candidiasis and perceived immunodeficiency problems to cause her to pre-diagnose patients without individualizing them.
Dean obtained a California medical license in 1993 but does not appear to have practiced there. After her Ontario license was revoked, the California authorities initiated action that led to a stipulated decision and order in 1999 under which she was placed on three years' probation but could not practice until she passed the Special Purpose Examination (SPEX), a test used to to determine basic medical knowledge. She was also required to take 120 more hours of continuing medical education than is normally required for license renewal.

Dean's current Web site states that she "specializes in managing and healing misdiagnosed and chronic conditions such as digestive problems, hormone imbalance, yeast overgrowth (Candida) recurring infection, irritable bowel syndrome, widespread inflammation, allergies, anxiety, fibromyalgia, mood swings, chronic fatigue syndrome, fluid retention, lost vitality, and other conditions that are not satisfactorily controlled." During the past several years, she has offered email and telephone consultations for which she charges $200 per hour. In 2008, she notified her supporters that she was moving to Hawaii and in 2010 would open a "medical spa" called VitaCosta in Costa Rica.
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