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Does anyone have any ideas of what type of clothing a man can wear so that it's quick and easy to get it on and off? He needs help with everything but is not in nappies yet.
Maybe what he wears around the house should be easier than what he wears when I take him out. I don't think he'd be happy wearing just a dressing gown.

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The velcro to close a shirt down the back is great, unless the patient can't take the seam. My bro is a quadriplegic. Having a hard seam down his back would be brutal for him. Everything he leans against and sits on, has to be smooth. No back pockets, no hoods, no buttons, zippers, no double layers that may bunch when he reclines. I love the velcro ideas though.
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T shirts with long or short sleeves work well if the patient can get the garment over his head unaided. otherwise as suggested above replace buttons and zippers with velcro. This can also be done with dress pants. for everyday quick acess. For everyday use elastic waisted sweat pants are the answer.
For those who are severely impaired and need to be dressed any type of shirt can be cut down the back and replaced with velcro.
A light weight shawl can be wrapped round the back or front and are very comforting.
A wrap aound towel with a velcro fastener at the waist provides privacy which is very important for most elderly men but provides easy acess for bath room visits especially for men who must stand up to be able to urinate. Very much depends on the severely of the impairment of the individual and his percieved need to keep up appearances
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Sweatpants or long sport pants. If he spends a lot of time sitting, then I would stay away from anything with pockets on the seat - any seam can contribute to pressure sores. Sweatshirts are easy enough and warm, but a little thick to get a jacket over. Again, if he spends a lot of time in a wheelchair, if you layer shirts, the undershirt can get bunched, causing a place with some pressure. For doctor appointments, a button up the front shirt always works well for us. Not to thick so that blood pressure can't be taken over the sleeve, and the doctor can unbutton the front to get to his chest.
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Or a moo moo.
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T-shirts & Elastic sweat pants.

No buttons, no zippers, no belts, no buckles.
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Also, you can always modify a sweatshirt by cutting it down the front and adding larger buttons or snaps to make them easy to get on and off. There are adaptive clothing suppliers on the web. Good luck!
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Depends on what's wrong with them, but my father has a colostomy right where is belt line is. We found overalls work best for him. They are a bit more expensive, but the come in different colors and doesn't interfere with his colostomy bag.
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also sweat pants and jogging pants that have zippers on the bottom of legs. No need to take off shoes. Pants slip right off.
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There is a company called Buck & Buck that specializes in adaptive clothing. They have a website.
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we got my Father some really soft sleep pants and he loved them!!! We always teased him that that was what the college kids wear... He had a wonderful sence of humor....
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I agree with everybody. Sweat pants and sweat shirts for fast easy changing. No buttons or zippers for them to contend with. Makes life easy for them as well as yourself. (I care for my 87 yr old father who has dementia)
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Walmart has a nice selection of sweatpants and matching jackets and coordinating tops. Reasonably priced. My husband loves them. They are easy to get on and off and have some room in the seat and thigh areas....not binding. They are warm in the winter too so they can be worn to the store or to doctor's appointments. I get the short sleeved tops so it is easier to have one's blood pressure taken. Easy to wash and dry too. Hope this helps.
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Pull-up pants with elastic waist -- sweatpants or cotton knit. My husband liked knit golf shirts --easier to get over the head than t-shirts. He had trouble with buttons, and if he'd needed the ease of a shirt that fully opened I would put velcro under the buttons.
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There are also microfiber pull on pants similar to sweats but they zip and unzip around the knee area so they can turn into long pants or shorts as needed.
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May I suggest sweats? For everyday wear, casual, you can get matching pants and pullovers. For outside wear to doctors, theaters, shopping centers, may I suggest no-belt pull-ups like Haband slacks and a no-button shirt or a zip shirt.
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Drawstring loose leg sweatpants, perhaps one size larger than normal and button down shirts work best with my 6'5" wheelchair-bound father.
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